News regarding traditional wisdom and native diets regarding nutrition.

Is This Enzyme in Processed Food Responsible for Gluten-Sensitive Diseases? Gluten May Not Be the Problem

A new study links a food processing enzyme known as mTg, microbial transglutaminase, to Celiac disease and intestinal permeability, aka “leaky gut” conditions. The authors looked at 69 studies concerning this food processing additive, and after analyzing and weighing the evidence they found a negative outcome in terms of intestinal health. The review article published by the journal Frontiers in Pediatrics in December of 2018 is titled, Microbial Transglutaminase Is Immunogenic and Potentially Pathogenic in Pediatric Celiac Disease.

Medical Professionals in Canada Speak Out Against Government Nutrition Guidelines – Promote High-fat Low-carb Diet Instead

Health Canada is in the process of revising its food guidelines for 2019. Some inside sources say there is not that much difference with this year's Canada Health food guidelines than previous years, except that overall it leans more toward a plant-based diet. Its final draft hasn't been published yet. Much like USDA nutritional guidelines, "healthy eating" is defined by avoiding saturated fats and emphasizing grains and carbohydrates. A group of physicians and nutritionists known as the Canadian Clinicians for Therapeutic Nutrition have opposed the Canadian government dietary advice and published their own opinions on the matter in the Calgary Herald citing the nutritional validity of healthy fats which can include meats and dairy, as they take a "whole foods" approach to eating rather than processed foods, promoting more of a high-fat and low-carb dietary approach. They represent a growing group of doctors and nutritionists who are more concerned about their patients' health than they are about being politically correct about diet and nutrition: "We have read the opinion article titled “Health Canada’s new Food Guide is on the right track” with interest. We represent a growing number of Canadian physicians and health professionals, called the Canadian Clinicians for Therapeutic Nutrition, who use whole-food nutritional strategies, which often include meat, eggs and dairy, to prevent and often put into remission the burden of chronic non-communicable disease in our patients. This usually involves lower levels of carbohydrates and higher levels of natural fats than is currently recommended, a therapeutic nutritional strategy well supported in the literature."

Research Shows High-Fat Low-Carb Diet with Coconut Oil Can Prevent or Cure Alzheimer’s

A very recent review on nutritional approaches toward preventing and reversing Alzheimer’s disease (AD) was conducted in Christchurch, New Zealand’s Canterbury University. The results were submitted to the journal Nutrition. It’s title: "The ketogenic diet as a potential treatment and prevention strategy for Alzheimer's disease." After analyzing 33 studies researching AD and other neurological disorders handled with a ketogenic diet and supplementing coconut oil, the University of Canterbury review analysis concluded: "In this review, we hypothesize that the ketogenic diet could be an effective treatment and prevention for Alzheimer's disease, but both ketone production and carbohydrate restriction may be needed to achieve this."

#1 Most-read Study of 2018 in the Medical Journal Pediatrics is How a High-Fat Diet can Help Type 1 Diabetes

A recent 2018 online survey of type 1 diabetics or their parents and caregivers has opened the door for others to use the ketogenic high-fat, low-carbohydrate, moderate protein diet to ease the burden of insulin injections and improve the day-to-day life of type 1 diabetics, potentially leading to remission. This was a breakthrough study, as the ketogenic diet has proven itself with diabetes type 2 sufferers, but there has been little looked into with keto for diabetes 1 patients. This study's focus was on serious carb production. Its title is Management of Type 1 Diabetes With a Very Low–Carbohydrate Diet, and it was published by Pediatrics, the "official journal" of the AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics). Dr. Lewis First, chief editor of Pediatrics, provided an article listing the top 10 items published by Pediatrics during 2018. This study was at the top of the list as the most popular article in Pediatrics for 2018.

Do You Know About These Hidden Chemicals in Common Foods?

Recently, the FDA announced that a group of six artificial flavors would no longer be permitted to be used as food additives. They are: synthetically-derived benzophenone, ethyl acrylate, methyl eugenol, myrcene, pulegone, and pyridine. If you’ve never heard of these, you’re not alone. Most Americans are completely unaware of the additives put into their food because the food industry does not need to list the chemicals they use in the ingredients. Instead, the federal government allows these chemicals to be obscured by being listed as “artificial flavors” or “natural flavors.” It’s time to stop letting Big Food and their crony capitalist friends get away with hiding the contents of their products and require them to list the chemicals they use in our food.

American Diabetes Association’s New Recommendations Would Keep Diabetics on Drugs Instead of Curing Diabetes Through Diet

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) just put out a position paper on treating diabetes. It’s focus on treatment and prevention, especially for the increasing incidents of diabetes 2 among youth, demonstrates the willful ignorance of institutions that create medical standards for the medical profession. What is ignored is the potential for treating obesity and diabetes 2 with the high-fat low-carb ketogenic diet, which has proven effective for all the factors leading to diabetes and diabetes 2 itself, even improving the overall health of those afflicted with diabetes 1, the less frequent form of diabetes that requires insulin injections.

Exposing Myths of Dietary Oils: The Omega 3 to Omega 6 Fatty Acid Ratio is Key

Dietary fats can be tricky business, as they're not all the same. While some are necessary for optimal health, others need to be balanced and some need to be avoided altogether, and understanding which is which is quite crucial, considering how important fats are for optimal health. Unfortunately, many health authorities have insisted omega-6-rich vegetable oils are healthier than saturated animal fats such as butter and lard, and this myth has been a tough one to dismantle, despite the evidence against it. Here, I will review some of the basics, including the importance of balancing your omega-3 and omega-6 intake, and why replacing saturated animal fats with omega-6-rich vegetable oils is such a bad idea.

Raw Milk Vending Machines Flourish in Europe

Would you love to visit a grass fed family farm where you can fill up a glass bottle with farm-fresh raw milk from a vending machine explicitly made for this purpose? In the U.K., this is not at all unusual. In fact, raw milk vending machines are becoming increasingly popular, including the one recently installed at Home Farm, a dairy farm in Hassop, England. In its first two weeks of operation, the farm owners say the machine has been a huge success and received “incredible” customer feedback. Known as the Simply Milk machine, it’s refilled every morning and provides fresh chilled milk from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. In stark contrast, while many Europeans are free to enjoy a glass of crisp raw milk anytime they like courtesy of self-serve vending machines, in North America selling raw milk is often forbidden. In Canada, for instance, it’s illegal to sell or give away raw milk, a law that’s enforced in many provinces. Ultimately, the choice of what to eat should belong to the individual consumer, not the state or federal government. If government agencies are allowed to impose their view of "safe food" on consumers, and dictate what’s legal and what’s not, raw milk won't be the only thing lost — one day virtually all food could be pasteurized, irradiated and/or genetically engineered.

High Fat Ketogenic Diet Successful in Treating Adult Epilepsy, Brain Tumors, and Alzheimers

A new review published in August 2018, in the Journal Brain Sciences looked at the effectiveness of the ketogenic diet to treat adult epilepsy, adult malignant glioma (brain tumors), and Alzheimer’s disease. It was written by Tanya J. W. McDonald and Mackenzie C. Cervenka from the Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The review is titled "The Expanding Role of Ketogenic Diets in Adult Neurological Disorders." The aim of the review is to describe the evidence, preclinical and clinical, supporting Ketogenic Diet use in the management of adult epilepsy, adult malignant gliomas (brain tumors), and Alzheimer’s disease. Several randomized controlled trials support the use of Ketogenic Diets for the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy and there is emerging evidence that these diets are also effective in treating refractory status epilepticus, malignant glioma and Alzheimer’s disease in adults.

Why Probiotics May Often Not Be Enough for Healthy Microbiomes: The Necessity of Prebiotics Like Resistant Starch

One of the latest nutritional discoveries that only recently began gaining good press and widespread awareness is something called resistant starch, or sometimes known as safe starch. This is a food quality, and it’s not relegated to one food - several different foods fall into this category. Resistant starch has been studied with increasing awareness of its ability to serve as a prebiotic, a fermentation fiber food source for friendly bacteria in the intestinal or gut flora. The results of an enhanced microbiome, in turn, lead to greater immunity to disease and improved overall health. Several different carbohydrate plant foods contain resistant starch. And some are enhanced with resistant starch by cooling after cooking. If it were not for the increased awareness of the microbiome’s friendly bacteria content and function over the past couple of decades, this resistant starch research information would probably still be under the radar of nutritional health awareness.