September 23, 2014

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Making Your Own Fermented Berry Sauce Making Your Own Fermented Berry Sauce

With summer winding down, we are often finding ourselves surrounded by fruits and vegetables that need to be used up. The farmer’s markets are overflowing and perhaps our own backyard is giving up its own abundance.

There are many ways to preserve berries. Processing berries at home has a few distinct advantages. For one, you get to control the ingredients. Starting with organic berries is crucial and a huge improvement over most store-bought conventional jams and spreads.

Beyond making jam from your organically-sourced fruit, fruit sauce is another option. We are familiar with applesauce which is made by cooking peeled apples down into a thick sauce-like consistency. This can then be canned and stored away for winter.

This fermented fruit sauce is different from the familiar applesauce in that it is raw, never cooked, and imbued with a starter culture which adds enzymes and probiotics. So, the nutrients of the berries are left intact when they might otherwise be lost in the cooking process, and the naturally occurring bacteria, enzymes, and vitamins in the berries are allowed to proliferate through the fermentation process.

Grassfed Traditions Adds New Artisan Butters from Grass-fed Milk Grassfed Traditions Adds New Artisan Butters from Grass-fed Milk

Tropical Traditions announced two new lines of artisan butters crafted from the milk of grass-fed pastured cows in their GrassfedTraditions line of products. Allgäu pure German Butter is from family farms in the Allgäu region of Southern Germany. These families feed their cows only grass and grass hay. Using their local breed, the Allgäu brown cow, the herdsmen in the Allgäu mountain region safely guide the cows down from the mountains to spend the winters in their cozy barns, and are led back up to the Alps every spring.

Nordic Creamery is family owned and operated making some of Wisconsin’s finest gourmet, artisan butter from the milk of cows on pasture. Award-winning Cheesemaker and Buttermaker Al Bekkum and his family live on the Bekkum-Langaard Farmstead owned and operated by their family since immigration from Norway in 1917. The farm is located among other Norwegian settlers in Westby, Wisconsin within Vernon County’s lush, green hills and valleys known as the Coulee Region. This un-glaciated land is recognized for its fertile soil and exceptional grazing land making their butter second to none.

These butters are shipped in coolers to all 50 states.

Study to Look at High Fat Diet’s Effect on Parkinson’s Patients Study to Look at High Fat Diet’s Effect on Parkinson’s Patients

The National College of Natural Medicine in Portland Oregon is teaming up with a local hospital to study the effects of the low-carb high-fat ketogenic diet on Parkinson’s patients. We have reported in the past how Parkinson’s sufferers have experienced relief when consuming large amounts of coconut oil.

Is a Low-Carb Diet Ruining Your Health? Is a Low-Carb Diet Ruining Your Health?

Chris Kresser is a practitioner of functional and integrative medicine and a licensed acupuncturist who blogs and is a very popular writer. A nutritionist on his staff, Laura Schoenfeld, caused quite a controversy recently with a blog post titled: Is a Low-Carb Diet Ruining Your Health?

The low-carb “paleo” diet followers have reached a cult-like following in recent times, and it seems Schoenfeld had crossed a “holy” line in suggesting that not everyone does well on a low-carb diet. Many in the “paleo” diet crowd believe that carbohydrates have no place in human nutrition at all.

Schoenfeld gave reasons from her own clinical practice as to why she feels not everyone does well on a low-carb diet, and listed several types of people that seem to do better with at least a moderate amount of carbohydrates in their diet.

The article generated so many comments, that Kresser added his own blog post to the topic: 7 Things Everyone Should Know About Low-Carb Diets.

20 Amazing Health Benefits of Tomatoes That Should Make Them A Daily Staple In Your Diet 20 Amazing Health Benefits of Tomatoes That Should Make Them A Daily Staple In Your Diet

Just one serving a day of tomato-based foods can have an incredibly beneficial effect on your health. Not only can they reduce heart disease, but they could potentially prevent and reverse dozens of diseases if eaten daily. This is one fruit you don’t want to leave out of your diet.

Therapeutic Use of the High-Fat Low-Carb Ketogenic Diet in Autism Spectrum Disorders Therapeutic Use of the High-Fat Low-Carb Ketogenic Diet in Autism Spectrum Disorders

A new study published in Frontiers in Pediatrics has concluded that the high-fat low-carb ketogenic diet may improve mitochondrial function in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

The ketogenic diet was originally developed at John Hopkins Hospital in the 1920s to treat children with epilepsy. The diet has proved successful over a long period of history of stopping seizures in children where drugs fail.

The diet fell out of favor in recent years, due to the bias against saturated fats. However, with several meta-studies being published in recent years showing that there is no scientific basis of linking saturated fat consumption to heart disease, the ketogenic diet is being studied in many disease applications, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and ALS.

There have also been studies conducted and published regarding the ketogenic diet’s effect on ASD. One study published last year (2013) in France showed a ketogenic diet improves multiple autistic behaviors.

Study: Low Salt Intake Associated with High Death Rates Study: Low Salt Intake Associated with High Death Rates

A new article in the New England Journal of Medicine (August 14, 2014) studied the sodium levels in 101,945 persons from 17 countries. The scientists examined the association between sodium excretion and the outcome of death and major cardiovascular events. Sodium excretion correlates directly with sodium ingestion.

This article is another in a long-line of salt articles debunking the myth that we need to lower our salt intake. I have tested thousands of patients for their salt levels. I can assure you that the vast majority of patients are low in salt.

Baking with the Ancient Grain Einkorn Baking with the Ancient Grain Einkorn

Einkorn is an ancient grain that is not yet commonly known in the western world, but used often in the Mediterranean region and in the mountainous areas of Europe. This grain is slightly finicky, completely delicious, good for you, has a slight yellowish tinge, and smells (and even looks) a little like corn flour.

Because of einkorn’s lower gluten elasticity, the following baking tips will help you bake successfully with einkorn and avoid a lot of frustration.

A Low Carbohydrate Diet Cures Diabetes A Low Carbohydrate Diet Cures Diabetes

Diabetes is the great failure of the medical system. A generation of following the high-carb low-fat USDA approved food pyramid, along with Big Food’s highly processed carbohydrate-rich products, have produced a national epidemic of obesity and diabetes.

The medical system’s answer to type 2 diabetes is drugs. These drugs, however, are highly toxic with serious side effects, and they don’t work. A recent study that showed that insulin may actually accelerate death in type 2 diabetes, for example.

Diabetes, however, is not a condition that is caused by a lack of drugs. Research clearly links type 2 diabetes (and now type 3 diabetes) to insulin resistance caused by excessive carbohydrates in the diet. This issue is finally starting to get more attention in the mainstream media, fortunately.

In a recent article published in the journal Nutrition, the authors showed that there is continued success in using low-carbohydrate diets in the treatment of diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

Food as Medicine: How One Hospital Is Using Organic Produce to Help Heal Patients Food as Medicine: How One Hospital Is Using Organic Produce to Help Heal Patients

Two weeks ago, Rodale Institute, in partnership with the nearby St. Luke’s University Health Network, launched a true farm-to-hospital food program.

The Anderson Campus at St. Luke’s has more than 300 acres of farmland, much of which had historically been farmed conventionally to raise crops like corn and soy. The hospital administration recognized the impact that providing fresh, local organic produce could have on patient health and approached Rodale Institute to transition the land to organic and farm vegetables to be used in patient meals and in the cafeteria.



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