Medical Cannabis is Healing Autism

The subject of autism and its causes is getting more attention due to the documentary Vaxxed. It's like a continual road show going from city to city with its crew of key personnel conducting panel discussions after showings. That's great and sorely needed. But there's little awareness promoted for treating autism among the vaccine damaged. The Cannabis Summit revealed several medical practitioners of different stripes who are willing and able to use cannabis in their practices. One of them was Dr. Bogner who presented on the topic “New Frontier on Autism Spectrum Disorder Recovery: Medical Marijuana."

First Holistic Cannabis Summit Seeks to Educate Public on Health Benefits of Marijuana

Seems like there's always some sort of summit being held online for various aspects of alternative health, which should be called real health. These summits gather several experts relating to a particular health topic, diet, optional cancer treatments, etc. But this author never expected a medical cannabis summit. Nevertheless, there is one now. Speakers from several medical and nutritional practices who prescribe cannabis partially or wholly with their individual practices are available in this summit, the Holistic Cannabis Summit. The amount of cannabis experts weighing in represents a very encouraging growing trend towards medical marijuana acceptance by holistic M.D.s and medical practitioners of all types.

Study: Substituting Cannabis for Alcohol and Deadly Prescription Drugs Offers Hope

A recently published study in the Drug and Alcohol Review examined 473 adults who substituted cannabis (marijuana) for "alcohol, illicit substances and prescription drugs." The subjects were using cannabis for therapeutic purposes (as opposed to the recreational use of marijuana). The study found that: "Substituting cannabis for one or more of alcohol, illicit drugs or prescription drugs was reported by 87% (n = 410) of respondents, with 80.3% reporting substitution for prescription drugs, 51.7% for alcohol, and 32.6% for illicit substances." Given the relative safety of cannabis (no recorded deaths from side effects of cannabis), and the tens of thousands of people who die every year from prescription drugs, cannabis should be looked at as a viable treatment for a variety of illnesses, as well as a substitute for "other psychoactive substances" that cause great harm through addiction and multiple side effects.

First Ever Holistic Cannabis Online Summit Launches

With the rapidly changing of state laws nationwide regarding access to cannabis (marijuana), there is renewed interest in research and use of cannabis for non-recreational health benefits. Prior to 1937 and the Marijuana Tax Act, which began the process of making cannabis illegal in the United States, cannabis was part of the American Medical Association’s prescribed pharmacopoeia for a variety of ailments, and doctors routinely wrote prescriptions for it. Today, researchers are looking at various varieties of cannabis to combat many illnesses where pharmaceutical products have largely failed, from cancer to Alzheimer's disease to epilepsy and many others. Because of out-dated federal laws still in place against cannabis, much of this research in the past has been hard to find, and non-mainstream. So even today, if one were to search for information on different varieties or how to treat illness with cannabis, that information is sorely lacking. Much of the online information is targeting the recreational use of marijuana. To address this need, the first ever HolisticCannabis Summit was organized by the HolisticCannabis Network for April 4-7, 2016. It features an all-star lineup of speakers that include medical doctors and other holistic health professionals knowledgeable in the area of cannabis or "medical marijuana."

Medical Cannabis Becoming More Available to American Consumers

As news about the disease-fighting abilities of medical cannabis (or medical marijuana) become more known, making cannabis a legitimate healing product rather than just a recreational drug, many consumers are beginning to research how one can avail of these curative natural medicines, and where to go to find them. Almost like dominoes falling against each other beginning with California, states have adopted medical marijuana laws to allow qualified patients access to home grown and locally dispensed cannabis products. California, Oregon, Washington State, and Colorado are the most well known. There are 19 other states plus the District of Columbia, bringing the total to 24 independent medical cannabis regions in the United States. There are a few additional states that allow cannabis without THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), the compound that has psychoactive effects. The result is an oil or tincture that produces medicinal effects without the "high." These formulas have shown to be effective for children who suffer chronic epileptic seizures, for example. The CBD (cannabidiol) strain is initially what impressed CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta to reverse his negative stand on medical marijuana applications and declare his positive opinion openly on TV, endorsing medical cannabis.

Can Cannabis Help Reverse Alzheimer’s?

Alzheimer's Disease and other forms of dementia have become increasingly epidemic among our expanding age 65 and over population. As of 2015, there are 5.3 million Americans diagnosed with Alzheimer's. At least a third of them don't know they are afflicted. Dementia and Alzheimer's are worsening epidemics, and the pharmaceutical industry has not provided real hope. One has to go outside of mainstream medicine's pharmacopoeia to slow or reverse dementia and Alzheimer's or other neurodegenerative diseases such as MS and Parkinson's. Health Impact News has been a leader in the Alternative Media documenting cases where coconut oil has brought tremendous results to those suffering from Alzheimer's and dementia, and the research and case studies are found at CoconutOil.com. Another alternative for Alzheimer's is one that still has legal issues in many states - it's cannabis or medical marijuana. It doesn't have to be smoked. There are edible options available. It may seem that using cannabis to reduce Alzheimer's symptoms is counter intuitive. But in addition to many anecdotal successes with cannabis for Alzheimer's and dementia, there has been some serious research.

Cannabis for the Treatment of Epilepsy, and More

Many drugs are developed not because there's a great medical need, but rather because there's big money to be made from them. In many cases, holistic therapies and medicines already exist that can take the place of any number of synthetic pharmaceuticals. Cannabis is one such therapy, and according to Dr. Gedde, "it's time to ask questions and look at a new way of thinking about this plant." A wealth of research shows marijuana does indeed have outstanding promise as a medicinal plant, largely due to its cannabidiol (CBD) content. Cannabinoids interact with your body by way of naturally occurring cannabinoid receptors embedded in cell membranes throughout your body. There are cannabinoid receptors in your brain, lungs, liver, kidneys, immune system, and more. Both the therapeutic and psychoactive properties of marijuana occur when a cannabinoid activates a cannabinoid receptor. According to Dr. Gedde, cannabis is certainly far safer than most prescription drugs, and there's enough information to compare it against the known toxicities of many drugs currently in use. This includes liver and kidney toxicity, gastrointestinal damage, nerve damage and, of course, death. Moreover, cannabidiol and other cannabis products often work when other medications fail, so not only are they generally safer, cannabis preparations also tend to provide greater efficacy.

Majority of Physicians in U.S. Now Favor Medical Cannabis

The use of marijuana for medical purposes is now legal in 23 states and, as of this writing, 9 states have pending legislation or ballot measures to legalize medical marijuana. Estimates are that between 85 and 95 percent of Americans are in favor of medical cannabis, and nearly 60 percent support complete legalization of marijuana. And doctors agree. In 2014, a survey found that the majority of physicians—56 percent—favor nationwide legalization of medical cannabis, with support being highest among oncologists and hematologists. However, many families are still unable, legally or otherwise, to obtain this herbal treatment. Families with a sick child are being forced to split up, just so that one parent can live in a place where medical cannabis can be legally obtained in order to help their child.

How Medical Cannabis Changed Our Lives: A Testimonial

My name is Dawn. The journey with medical Cannabis began for our family in May of 2013. Our son Jacob was diagnosed with a very rare form of Dystrophy in 2006. This disease manifested at age four, causing him to lose function in his central nervous system, as the myelin sheath began to deteriorate. Jacob also experiences grand mal seizures that hinder his breathing, leaving him in a disastrous state. My goal with this article is to present to communities a very real picture of the truth of what caregiving parents with certain special needs children are experiencing, and the reason cannabis is changing lives. I thank you for giving me a moment of your time and a listening ear.

Study: Legalizing Medical Marijuana Leads to Fewer Prescription Drug Overdose Deaths

A study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine on Monday found that states that had legalized medical marijuana had seen a 25 percent drop in deaths related to prescription drug overdoses. According to ABC News, the researchers conducting the study found that because “legalizing medical marijuana makes it more available to chronic pain patients, it provides a potentially less lethal alternative to pain control on a long-term basis.” Over the course of the study, the states studied were the ones that allowed access to medical marijuana. The Washington Post reported that those states “had 1,729 fewer overdose deaths in 2010 than would be predicted by trends in states without such laws.” Dr. Marcus Bachhuber, a physician and researcher at the University of Pennsylvania, and the lead author of the study, told ABC News that while he did expect to see changes among the states that legalized medical marijuana, he found it “surprising that the difference is so big.”