Study: Ovarian Cancer not Ovarian! Millions of Women Have Ovaries Surgically Removed Needlessly?

A recently published study (October 2017) challenges the accepted mainstream medical theory that ovarian cancer is developed in the ovaries. The study, "Molecular analysis of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma with and without associated serous tubal intra-epithelial carcinoma," was conducted by medical researchers in 2016 at both the Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute and Johns Hopkins. The study contends that, "For decades it was thought that ovarian carcinoma originates in the OSE or ovarian CICs, but few data supported this claim. Lesions resembling an intraepithelial carcinoma in CICs and the OSE are rare. In contrast, a putative precursor of ovarian carcinoma has been described in the fallopian tube, designated STIC, which is found frequently in association with “ovarian” HGSCs and in the fallopian tubes removed prophylactically from high-risk women. The implications of these findings are to direct efforts for prevention and early detection toward the distal fallopian tube, rather than the OSE. Ongoing and planned clinical trials are investigating bilateral salpingectomy with ovarian preservation as a viable option for ovarian cancer risk-reduction." Women are often encouraged to have their ovaries removed during an existing pelvic operation to ensure protection against ovarian cancer. Dr. Robert J. Rowen, M.D. is questioning the need for such surgeries in light of this new study. The result of surgically removing ovaries, for millions of women, according to Dr. Rowen, has been: “… a nightmare of hormonal difficulties. The ovaries do, in fact, make some hormone even after menopause and all the eggs are gone.”

$70 Million Awarded to Woman with Ovarian Cancer Due to Baby Powder Usage

A St. Louis jury on Thursday awarded a California woman more than $70 million in her lawsuit alleging that years of using Johnson & Johnson’s baby powder caused her cancer, the latest case raising concerns about the health ramifications of extended talcum powder use. The jury ruling ended the trial that began Sept. 26 in the case brought by Deborah Giannecchini of Modesto. She was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2012. The suit accused Johnson & Johnson of “negligent conduct” in making and marketing its baby powder.

Johnson & Johnson Hid Talcum Powder Link to Ovarian Cancer for 40 Years

Johnson & Johnson (J&J) is a well-known and trusted "baby friendly" brand, producing a range of baby products and feminine hygiene items. Unfortunately, J&J has failed the public trust yet again. And the lack of regulations relating to cosmetics is what helped them bury the dangers of one of its flagship products. In 2008, I warned women to cease using talcum powder. I noted there were several studies showing that applying talcum powder to the genital area might raise a woman's risk of ovarian cancer if the powder particles were to travel up through her vagina and get lodged in her ovaries. In February, 2016, a jury found J&J's talcum powder had contributed to 62-year old Jacqueline Fox's ovarian cancer, awarding Fox $72 million in damages. Ten million dollars was awarded for compensatory damages. Another $62 million in punitive damages was awarded to her family members, as Fox died last fall, succumbing to the disease after being diagnosed with ovarian cancer three years ago.