Government Attempting to Clamp Down on Medical Cannabis States While Allowing Opioid Pain Killers to Flow into Black Markets

While other nations are allowing medical allowances for cannabis or beginning to see the potential for cannabis applied medicinally, here in the USA dark clouds are forming federally that threaten existing medical marijuana states. Meanwhile, the real drug epidemic of opioid painkillers goes not only unhampered, but encouraged by the same dark clouds in Washington, D.C. The Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) has hampered legal action against pharmaceutical drug trafficking while the Rohrabacher-Farr amendment that protects medical marijuana states is in jeopardy. A recent 60 Minutes investigative report with a former DEA whistleblower reveals the likely motive behind the recent attacks against medical cannabis and the proliferation of the opioid pain killer epidemic.

Profitable Opioid Painkillers and Synthetic Pot Patents: Big Pharma’s Motivation to Keep Marijuana Illegal

Last year’s November elections included several state ballots to either introduce medical marijuana or expand beyond permissible medical applications and allow “recreational” use for adults. Former marijuana resistant states Florida, North Dakota, Arkansas, and Montana passed medical cannabis measures by popular vote. States that had medical marijuana allowances already in place, California, Massachusetts, Nevada, and Maine approved adult recreational marijuana. But the biggest surprise for many was Arizona voters' rejection of an adult recreational use measure, Proposition 205. Arizona was the only state that refused to advance from its current cannabis status at the polls. Arizonians for Responsible Drug Policy (ARDP) was the major front group for hire that publicly opposed Arizona's Proposition 205. And its main donor of a half million dollars was a pharmaceutical company based out of Arizona known as Insys Therapeutics. Was Insys Therapeutics' motivation to oppose legal marijuana its lucrative opioid painkiller market, or its recent approval for a patent to make a synthetic form of marijuana?

Dr. Oz Looks at Medical Marijuana as a Potential Cure for Opioid Addiction

Opioid painkiller addiction is the fastest growing drug addiction in the United States today, and it was recently featured on the popular Dr. Oz TV show. Dr. Oz pointed out the astonishing statistics that 48 million Americans, one out of every 5, have reported that they have abused prescription drugs. 12 states have more opioid pain pill prescriptions than people. In states where marijuana is legal, however, opioid prescriptions are declining. Dr. Oz looks at the question: Is marijuana the new gateway drug OUT of opioid addiction?