Two Meta-Analysis Reviews Confirm (Yet Again) the Link between Mercury and Autism Spectrum Disorder

Mercury is a potent neurotoxin. Even the smallest amounts can cause cumulative adverse effects. Two of the most widespread forms of mercury exposure come from the organic compounds methylmercury (found in fish) and ethylmercury, which makes up 50% of the vaccine preservative thimerosal. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) affirms that young children and fetuses are particularly sensitive to harmful mercury-related effects such as “brain damage, mental retardation, incoordination, blindness, seizures and inability to speak.” This calls into question public health authorities’ aggressive peddling of annual flu shots—many of which contain thimerosal. The influenza vaccine guidelines target all children who are at least six months of age, with two closely spaced doses recommended for very young children in their “first season of vaccination.” They also target pregnant women and women who “might” be pregnant. Organic mercury can cross the blood-brain barrier, and numerous studies have fingered it as a major offender in increasing the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), tic disorders, delayed language and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Shamefully, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) refuses to admit that mercury is an ASD risk factor. Instead, it has been left up to other researchers to continue to focus attention on the compelling relationship between mercury and ASD.

Grassroots Efforts to Allow Medical Cannabis to Treat Autism

With the addition of Pennsylvania and Ohio in 2016, the total number of states in America allowing the use of cannabis medically is now 25. The non-state known as the District of Columbia or Washington, D.C., the nation's capitol, also has allowances for medical cannabis. They all have variations of what ailments or diseases are allowed for obtaining a medical marijuana permit. The states that are the most liberal include Colorado, Washington (state), and Oregon. They allow recreational use of marijuana, thus eliminating the need for approval from a bureaucratic medical marijuana approval system. Some states have more restrictions than others. For example, in New Mexico, hepatitis C is a condition allowed for cannabis, but only if one is using an FDA approved medically prescribed anti-viral. In other words, only as an adjunct for interferon type drugs that have a history of nasty side effects. This helps keep those who would rather avoid the medical system in it. Nearby Arizona allows cannabis for hepatitis C without the concurrent anti-viral treatment requirement. But so far, only one state allows medical cannabis for those diagnosed with aggressive or destructive autism, Delaware. Currently, a panel within the Minnesota Department of Health has met to discuss the possibility of including autism as a qualified condition for cannabis use. If you are a Minnesota resident and wish to register your supporting opinion or parental giver story with that panel, they are open to comments until September 20th.