Study: THC from Cannabis Helps Restore Memory Loss due to Aging and Dementia

A recent 2018 animal study has indicated that cannabis with THC helps restore memory loss due to aging and dementia. This is what many medical cannabis users and experts already know. The human cannabis experience has outpaced mainstream science considerably. But it does help create some medical cannabis scientific credibility with mainstream medicine. The well known and often vilified cannabis compound known as THC (Δ9 aka delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol) is the compound or cannabinoid that creates the euphoric “high.” Biased false claims that THC causes brain damage is the main reason why truly independent research is restricted from national funding in the USA unless it supports government marijuana danger claims. This new study, A chronic low dose of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) restores cognitive function in old mice, was conducted in Germany with national funding through the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft). According to Newsweek magazine online and some other magazines and websites that covered this study, the study authors wrote: "Cannabis preparations and THC are used for medicinal purposes. They have an excellent safety record and do not produce adverse side-effects when administered at a low dose to older individuals. Thus, chronic, low-dose treatment with THC or cannabis extracts could be a potential strategy to slow down or even to reverse cognitive decline in the elderly."

Study: Cannabis More Effective Than Pharmaceutical Drugs for Age-Related Neurodegenerative Diseases Like Alzheimer’s

The prevailing safety concerns about marijuana from mainstream medicine, mainstream media, and government officials are focused on the brain. Somehow getting “high on pot” is associated with brain damage. And brain damage is the battle cry of marijuana prohibitionists. An earlier Health Impact News article presented the truth about this myth and how it started. It also provides information that points out the fact that cannabis is a brain health herb. In fact, full spectrum cannabis with THC included has been reported empirically by individuals and scientific studies to do the opposite of damaging the brain: It apparently heals brain damage. A June 2016 in-vitro study titled, Amyloid proteotoxicity initiates an inflammatory response blocked by cannabinoids, published in Nature Partner Journal – Aging and Mechanics of Disease, used a cultured brain tissue to better study the biochemical and cellular mechanics involved. The study was conducted at the Salk Institute of La Jolla, California, and coordinated with the University of California in San Diego. The study was funded by The Burns Foundation, The Bundy Foundation, and, surprisingly, the National Institutes of Health (NIH). From the study: "Nerve cell death from the accumulation of aggregated or amyloid-like proteins is a common theme in most age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases. However, there are no drugs that significantly inhibit cell death associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s or Huntington’s diseases. Although other studies have offered evidence that cannabinoids might be neuroprotective against the symptoms of Alzheimer’s, we believe our study is the first to demonstrate that cannabinoids affect both inflammation and amyloid beta accumulation in nerve cells."

Medical Cannabis Becoming More Available to American Consumers

As news about the disease-fighting abilities of medical cannabis (or medical marijuana) become more known, making cannabis a legitimate healing product rather than just a recreational drug, many consumers are beginning to research how one can avail of these curative natural medicines, and where to go to find them. Almost like dominoes falling against each other beginning with California, states have adopted medical marijuana laws to allow qualified patients access to home grown and locally dispensed cannabis products. California, Oregon, Washington State, and Colorado are the most well known. There are 19 other states plus the District of Columbia, bringing the total to 24 independent medical cannabis regions in the United States. There are a few additional states that allow cannabis without THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), the compound that has psychoactive effects. The result is an oil or tincture that produces medicinal effects without the "high." These formulas have shown to be effective for children who suffer chronic epileptic seizures, for example. The CBD (cannabidiol) strain is initially what impressed CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta to reverse his negative stand on medical marijuana applications and declare his positive opinion openly on TV, endorsing medical cannabis.