Experts Review of 107 Scientific Studies: Cholesterol Does Not Cause Heart Disease – Statin Drugs are Useless

A recent massive study review coordinated by 16 medical scholars and practicing MDs throughout England, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Sweden, and the USA has confirmed the falsity of the lipid theory of heart disease that blames cholesterol, and the disinformation and dangers of cholesterol-lowering statin drugs. Its title is LDL-C Does Not Cause Cardiovascular Disease: a comprehensive review of current literature. LDL-C stands for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, aka the "bad cholesterol". This review was not funded by any government agency, non-government organization, or pharmaceutical company. It was not funded at all.

Do We Need More Cholesterol-Lowering Medications?

Do we need more cholesterol-lowering medications? Big Pharma thinks so. A new class of cholesterol-lowering medications called PCSK9 inhibitors is being unleashed on us. PCSK9 inhibitors are monoclonal antibodies. PCSK9 can bind to LDL-cholesterol receptors on the cell walls. Once the PCSK9 binds to the LDL-cholesterol receptor, the complex is absorbed into the cell and broken down. Therefore, circulating LDL-cholesterol cannot enter the cell and will rise in the serum. When PCSK9 inhibitors block this reaction, the LDL-cholesterol receptors will bind the circulating LDL-cholesterol, lowering serum cholesterol levels. Two drugs have recently been released that function as PCSK9 inhibitors: Alirocumab and Evolocumab. The costs for these medications average around $10-15,000 per year. Since these drugs are indicated for patients who have cardiovascular disease, one would think that the PCSK9 drugs have been proven to have a benefit in treating/preventing cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, you would think that the expensive price of these drugs would indicate that they are more effective than the drugs that are presently available. Guess what? There are zero studies showing PCSK9 inhibitors have any real benefit.

Low Cholesterol Levels Associated with 990% Higher Mortality After Heart Attack

A recent study in Critical Care Medicine is titled, “Lipid Paradox in Acute Myocardial Infarction- The Association with 30-Day In-Hospital Mortality.” This study followed 724 hospitalized patients who suffered an acute heart attack (i.e., myocardial infarction). The scientists attempted to clarify the relationship between the lipid profiles and the 30-day mortality in patients who suffered a heart attack. The authors found that those with lower LDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels had a significantly elevated mortality risk when compared to patients with higher LDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Why would lowered cholesterol and triglyceride levels be associated with a higher mortality rate? Fats from triglycerides are a major energy source and LDL-cholesterol is critical for cell membrane synthesis and is needed to fight infections. Adequate LDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels may be critical for cell function and survival in the case of a heart attack—as well as in other conditions. Folks, we have been hoodwinked to believe that we must all take cholesterol-lowering medications in order to prevent and/or treat heart disease. People do not get heart disease because their cholesterol level is elevated. Remember, 50% of patients who suffer a heart attack have normal cholesterol levels.

LDL “Bad cholesterol” Indicates an Amino Acid Deficiency, 99 Year Old Researcher Says

Fred Kummerow is an emeritus professor of comparative biosciences at the University of Illinois, and at 99 years of age, he is still conducting and publishing research. For over 60 years Professor Kummerow has warned about the dangers of trans fats, even suing the FDA for not removing the GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status on them years after most other countries had banned them. Professor Kummerow has also battled against the standard thinking regarding cholesterol, stating that dietary cholesterol is good for your heart and that there are other factors that contribute to heart disease. In a paper published in 2013 in the American Journal of Cardiovascular Disease, he explained once again that oxidized lipids (and oxidized cholesterol), as is found in overheated polyunsaturated oils like corn and soy, are leading contributing factors to heart disease. In 2014, Professor Kummerow was still going strong at age 99, and has just published a new paper showing that LDL cholesterol is simply a marker for an amino acid deficiency and not the cause of heart disease at all.