Soda Industry Dying as Americans Seek Healthy Beverages that Don’t Cause Diabetes, Obesity

Americans are finally waking up to the fact that drinking soda is an unhealthy practice. Sales of sugary, carbonated drinks have fallen dramatically in recent years, sending the soda industry into a panic. A recent piece in The New York Times by Margot Sanger-Katz details the decline in soda sales and the efforts that led to it.

Saturated Fat Helps Avoid Diabetes

About one in three Americans now has diabetes or pre-diabetes. That's nearly 80 million people, the majority of whom suffer from type 2 diabetes – a preventable and, often, reversible condition. The problem is that many Americans are unaware that the foods they're eating could be setting them up for a dietary disaster, and this isn't their fault. Public health guidelines condemn healthy fats from foods like butter and full-fat dairy and recommend whole grains and cereals – the opposite of what a person with diabetes, or any person really, needs to stay healthy. For the last 50 years, Americans have been told to eat a high complex carbohydrate, low saturated fat diet. Even diabetics have been told to eat 50 to 60 percent of their daily calories in the form of processed carbs! Research, including a new study involving dolphins, again suggests that this movement away from traditional full-fat foods is contributing to the rising rates of diabetes and metabolic syndrome across the globe.

The Major Role Soybean Oil Plays in Obesity and Diabetes

Soybean oil is the most common oil used in the US, but this is a relatively new phenomenon. Prior to 1900, cooking was done with lard and butter, and the processed foods that are now primary sources of soybean oil (and other soy ingredients) were nonexistent. In the 1950s, saturated fats were condemned on the basis of them raising your cholesterol and causing heart disease – a theory that has since been proven wrong, but which is still lingering in medical offices and public nutrition regulations. Partially hydrogenated soybean oil was developed to replace saturated fats like butter and lard in the food supply. Not only did consumers embrace it, but food manufacturers did even more so because of its low cost, long shelf-life, and stability at room temperature. There was just one problem: partially hydrogenated oils are sources of trans fats, which are now known to cause chronic health problems such as obesity, asthma, auto-immune disease, cancer, and bone degeneration. Yet, even if you take the hydrogenation process out of the picture, soybean oil is still detrimental to your health. While trans fats are now being pulled out of processed foods due to their extreme health risks, soybean oil is still fair game… but it shouldn’t be – and here’s why.

Study: Soybean Oil Linked to Obesity and Diabetes More than Coconut Oil and Fructose

Scientists in California published a study investigating the effects of saturated versus unsaturated fat in the diets of mice, as well as fructose, on obesity and diabetes. The unsaturated fat was soybean oil, and the saturated fat was coconut oil, along with a fructose. Soybean oil came out the clear loser when looking at the dietary effect on obesity and diabetes.

Another Study Shows Strong Link Between Cholesterol-lowering Statin Drugs and Diabetes

Another study has confirmed that statin drug use increases one's chance of developing diabetes. Statin drugs are the all-time leading prescription drugs sold in the U.S. and around the world, prescribed by doctors to lower people's cholesterol levels. It is estimated that one out of every 4 people in the United States over the age of 50 is currently taking statin drugs for cholesterol. This current study just published looked at 26,000 beneficiaries of Tricare, the military health system. They found that those taking statin drugs to control their cholesterol were 87 percent more likely to develop diabetes. The study was published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. This is just the latest study to link statin drugs to diabetes, especially in women. Studies published in 2014 caused over 2000 lawsuits to be filed against Pfizer, the maker of the best-selling drug of all-time, Lipitor.

1300+ Lawsuits Against Lipitor Yet Statins Most Prescribed Drug in New Jersey

Bernstein Liebhard LLP is reporting that there are more than 1,300 product liability lawsuits involving Lipitor and diabetes now pending in U.S. District Court. They are also reporting that despite all the alleged injuries due to statin cholesterol-lowering drugs, statin medication now ranks as the most prescribed medication in the state of New Jersey.

20 Amazing Health Benefits of Tomatoes That Should Make Them A Daily Staple In Your Diet

Just one serving a day of tomato-based foods can have an incredibly beneficial effect on your health. Not only can they reduce heart disease, but they could potentially prevent and reverse dozens of diseases if eaten daily. This is one fruit you don't want to leave out of your diet.

A Low Carbohydrate Diet Cures Diabetes

Diabetes is the great failure of the medical system. A generation of following the high-carb low-fat USDA approved food pyramid, along with Big Food's highly processed carbohydrate-rich products, have produced a national epidemic of obesity and diabetes. The medical system's answer to type 2 diabetes is drugs. These drugs, however, are highly toxic with serious side effects, and they don't work. A recent study that showed that insulin may actually accelerate death in type 2 diabetes, for example. Diabetes, however, is not a condition that is caused by a lack of drugs. Research clearly links type 2 diabetes (and now type 3 diabetes) to insulin resistance caused by excessive carbohydrates in the diet. This issue is finally starting to get more attention in the mainstream media, fortunately. In a recent article published in the journal Nutrition, the authors showed that there is continued success in using low-carbohydrate diets in the treatment of diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

Study: Insulin May Actually Accelerate Death in Type 2 Diabetes

In the United States, nearly 80 million people, or one in four has some form of diabetes or pre-diabetes. What's worse, both type 1 and type 2 diabetes among children and teens has also skyrocketed. The most recent data, reveals that, between 2001 and 2009, incidence of type 1 diabetes among children under the age of 19 rose by 21 percent. Incidence of type 2 diabetes among children aged 10-19 rose by 30 percent during that same timeframe! Statistics such as these point to two very important facts. First, it tells us that diabetes cannot be primarily caused by genetics, and secondly, it literally screams that something we're doing, consistently and en masse, is horribly wrong, and we need to address it. A study published in the June 30, 2014 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine concluded that insulin therapy in type 2 diabetic patients may indeed do more harm than good.

Diabetic Drugs Increase Mortality

Why do Type 2 (adult-onset) diabetics have high blood sugar? Is it because they are lacking a prescription drug that lowers blood sugar levels? Of course not. Diabetics have elevated blood sugars because they have hormonal and nutritional imbalances often caused by eating an unhealthy diet. The conventional treatment for diabetes revolves around giving poor dietary advice–eat low-fat foods with lots of carbohydrates and use toxic artificial sweeteners– and the use of prescription medications that do not treat the underlying cause of diabetes. A recent article titled, “14-Year Risk of All-Cause Mortality According to Hypoglycemic Drug Exposure in a General Population” assessed the safety data of diabetic drugs over a 14-year time period. The authors studied 3336 participants and 248 deaths over a 14-year time period. Diabetes drugs increase mortality rates.