Another Study Shows Strong Link Between Cholesterol-lowering Statin Drugs and Diabetes

Another study has confirmed that statin drug use increases one's chance of developing diabetes. Statin drugs are the all-time leading prescription drugs sold in the U.S. and around the world, prescribed by doctors to lower people's cholesterol levels. It is estimated that one out of every 4 people in the United States over the age of 50 is currently taking statin drugs for cholesterol. This current study just published looked at 26,000 beneficiaries of Tricare, the military health system. They found that those taking statin drugs to control their cholesterol were 87 percent more likely to develop diabetes. The study was published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. This is just the latest study to link statin drugs to diabetes, especially in women. Studies published in 2014 caused over 2000 lawsuits to be filed against Pfizer, the maker of the best-selling drug of all-time, Lipitor.

1300+ Lawsuits Against Lipitor Yet Statins Most Prescribed Drug in New Jersey

Bernstein Liebhard LLP is reporting that there are more than 1,300 product liability lawsuits involving Lipitor and diabetes now pending in U.S. District Court. They are also reporting that despite all the alleged injuries due to statin cholesterol-lowering drugs, statin medication now ranks as the most prescribed medication in the state of New Jersey.

20 Amazing Health Benefits of Tomatoes That Should Make Them A Daily Staple In Your Diet

Just one serving a day of tomato-based foods can have an incredibly beneficial effect on your health. Not only can they reduce heart disease, but they could potentially prevent and reverse dozens of diseases if eaten daily. This is one fruit you don't want to leave out of your diet.

A Low Carbohydrate Diet Cures Diabetes

Diabetes is the great failure of the medical system. A generation of following the high-carb low-fat USDA approved food pyramid, along with Big Food's highly processed carbohydrate-rich products, have produced a national epidemic of obesity and diabetes. The medical system's answer to type 2 diabetes is drugs. These drugs, however, are highly toxic with serious side effects, and they don't work. A recent study that showed that insulin may actually accelerate death in type 2 diabetes, for example. Diabetes, however, is not a condition that is caused by a lack of drugs. Research clearly links type 2 diabetes (and now type 3 diabetes) to insulin resistance caused by excessive carbohydrates in the diet. This issue is finally starting to get more attention in the mainstream media, fortunately. In a recent article published in the journal Nutrition, the authors showed that there is continued success in using low-carbohydrate diets in the treatment of diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

Study: Insulin May Actually Accelerate Death in Type 2 Diabetes

In the United States, nearly 80 million people, or one in four has some form of diabetes or pre-diabetes. What's worse, both type 1 and type 2 diabetes among children and teens has also skyrocketed. The most recent data, reveals that, between 2001 and 2009, incidence of type 1 diabetes among children under the age of 19 rose by 21 percent. Incidence of type 2 diabetes among children aged 10-19 rose by 30 percent during that same timeframe! Statistics such as these point to two very important facts. First, it tells us that diabetes cannot be primarily caused by genetics, and secondly, it literally screams that something we're doing, consistently and en masse, is horribly wrong, and we need to address it. A study published in the June 30, 2014 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine concluded that insulin therapy in type 2 diabetic patients may indeed do more harm than good.

Diabetic Drugs Increase Mortality

Why do Type 2 (adult-onset) diabetics have high blood sugar? Is it because they are lacking a prescription drug that lowers blood sugar levels? Of course not. Diabetics have elevated blood sugars because they have hormonal and nutritional imbalances often caused by eating an unhealthy diet. The conventional treatment for diabetes revolves around giving poor dietary advice–eat low-fat foods with lots of carbohydrates and use toxic artificial sweeteners– and the use of prescription medications that do not treat the underlying cause of diabetes. A recent article titled, “14-Year Risk of All-Cause Mortality According to Hypoglycemic Drug Exposure in a General Population” assessed the safety data of diabetic drugs over a 14-year time period. The authors studied 3336 participants and 248 deaths over a 14-year time period. Diabetes drugs increase mortality rates.

Study Compares American Diabetes Association Low-fat Diet to High-fat Ketogenic Diet for Helping Diabetes: Ketogenic Diet Wins

A study published in April 2014 compared two diets with overweight diabetic people. One group ate the standard recommended diet by the American Diabetes Association, which was a low-fat, high carbohydrate, restricted calorie diet, as per the USDA dietary guidelines for a "healthy" diet. The other group, almost in direct contrast to the ADA diet, was encouraged to eat a a very low carbohydrate, high fat, non calorie-restricted ketogenic diet. The results? The ketogenic diet group, although eating far more calories than the ADA group, lost more weight, and more ketogenic dieters reduced their diabetes medication than did the ADA group.

Could Magnesium Deficiency Be Causing Many of Your Health Problems?

Magnesium is one of the most essential minerals required for more than 300 biochemical reactions in the body. It controls nerve impulses, body temperature regulation, detoxification, energy production, and the formation of healthy bones and teeth. There are over hundred different symptoms and cofactors of magnesium deficiency, some of which include muscle pain, insomnia, fibromyalgia, migraines, and low bone density.

Diabetes Drug Avandia Banned in Europe for Causing Cardiovascular Death, but FDA Clears it in U.S.

Diabetes drug Avandia was linked to significantly increased risks of heart attack and cardiovascular death, prompting the FDA to restrict access to the drug in 2010. Europe banned Avandia, taking it completely off the market. The FDA has now announced it is lifting those restrictions to allow widespread access to the drug once again. The decision was based on a heavily criticized study conducted by the drug’s maker, GlaxoSmithKline (which pleaded guilty to fraud in 2012 for failing to report safety problems with Avandia).

Grape Seed Extract Superior To Blockbuster Diabetes Drug

A new study published in the Journal of Cell Communication and Signaling compared the effects of a grape seed extract (GSP) to the diabetes drug metformin (MET) in rats fed a high fat, high fructose diet (HFFD) designed to provoke insulin resistance. The weight of evidence suggests that grape seed proanthrocyanins hold great promise as a metformin alternative and/or anti-diabetic agent. Unfortunately, the law forbids the medicinal use of natural substances, and lacking the $800 million plus required on average to fund the clinical trials necessary to file for FDA drug approval, health consumers are left almost entirely without guidance from conventional medical practitioners who lose their FDA-underwritten liability shield when they deviate from the drug-based standard of care.