Has the CDC done a study on vaccinated vs unvaccinated children


Health Impact News Editor Comments:

Once again, we have an example of a study funded by pro-vaccine researchers that looks at a sub-set of the population and compares those who are vaccinated versus those who are not vaccinated, and finds a result they were not expecting. So they spin the study to make it seem like the result was the one they were trying to prove, and then the mainstream media publishes the spin, instead of what the actual study showed. We saw that earlier this year with a JAMA study looking at vaccinated versus under-vaccinated children.

The latest occurrence of this phenomenon is a CDC study looking at Human Papillomavirus occurrence and vaccine rates. This study was headline news in all the major media outlets last week with headlines such as: “HPV vaccine cut infection by half in teen girls” and “news” stories that looked like they were promo pieces written by the vaccine manufacturer.

Sharlene Bidini has looked at the actual study, however, and points out a few facts that the mainstream media left out (probably because they never bothered to read the study itself.)

Assessing the Overall Impact of the HPV Vaccine

by Sharlene Bidini, RD, CSO
The Oncology Nurse Community


A new study, published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, provides new data regarding the effectiveness of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in reducing HPV prevalence.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) started recommending routine Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in June 2006. In order to estimate the effectiveness of the HPV vaccine, researchers used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES), 2003-2006 and 2007-2010.

Here is the conclusion from the study: Within four years of vaccine introduction, the vaccine-type HPV prevalence decreased among females aged 14-19 years despite low vaccine uptake. The estimated vaccine effectiveness was high.

The study conclusion (drawn from the NHANES survey 2007-2010) was based on 740 girls, aged 14-19. However, only 358 were sexually active, and of those, only 111 had at least 1 HPV shot. If the study authors were trying to determine vaccine effectiveness, why did they include the girls who had not received a single HPV shot or did not report having sex?

An interesting fact that was not shared, was that among those 740 girls, the HPV prevalence of high-risk, non-vaccine types declined 20.7 percent (from 20.7 percent to 16.4 percent).

Some healthcare professionals may be quick to assume that the HPV reduction was an obvious outcome after mass immunization. However, the data provided in Table 3 clearly demonstrates that the unvaccinated girls in this group had the best outcome. The study table separates the HPV prevalence into three categories: overall, vaccinated, and unvaccinated.

The overall prevalence of HPV in the study period 2007-2010 was 42.9 percent when the vaccinated and unvaccinated girls are combined. In 2007-2010, the overall prevalence of HPV was 50 percent in the vaccinated girls (14-19 years), but only 38.6 percent in the unvaccinated girls of the same age. Therefore, HPV prevalence dropped 27.3 percent in the unvaccinated girls, but only declined by 5.8 percent in the vaccinated group.

Read the Full Article Here: http://www.theonc.org/author.asp?section_id=2414&doc_id=265168

Vaccine Epidemic
by Louise Kuo Habakus and Mary Holland J.D.

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