July 25, 2014

White House stalls critical EPA report highlighting chemical dangers to children

pin it button White House stalls critical EPA report highlighting chemical dangers to children

pesticide chemicals White House stalls critical EPA report highlighting chemical dangers to children

By Sheila Kaplan
American University School of Communication

A landmark Environmental Protection Agency report concluding that children exposed to toxic substances can develop learning disabilities, asthma and other health problems has been sidetracked indefinitely amid fierce opposition from the chemical industry.

America’s Children and the Environment, Third Edition, is a sobering analysis of the way in which pollutants build up in children’s developing bodies and the damage they can inflict.

The report is unpublished, but was posted on EPA’s website in draft form in March 2011, marked “Do not Quote or Cite.”  The report, which is fiercely contested by the chemical industry, was referred to the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB), where it still languishes.

For the first time since the ACE series began in 2000, the draft cites extensive research linking common chemical pollutants to brain damage and nervous system disorders in fetuses and children.  It also raises troubling questions about the degree to which children are exposed to hazardous chemicals in air, drinking water and food, as well exposures in their indoor environments — including schools and day-care centers — and through contaminated lands.

In the making since 2008, the ACE report is based on peer-reviewed research and databases from federal agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration, Housing and Urban Development and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Public health officials view it as a source of one-stop shopping for the best information on what children and women of childbearing age are exposed to, how much of it remains in their bodies and what the health effects might be. Among the “health outcomes” listed as related to environmental exposures are childhood cancer, obesity, neurological disorders, respiratory problems and low birth weight.

The  EPA’s website still notes that the report will be published by the end of 2011.  But after a public comment period that was marked by unusually harsh criticism from industry, additional peer review and input from other agencies, the report landed at OMB last March, where it has remained. No federal rule requires the OMB to review such a report before publication, but an EPA spokeswoman said the EPA referred it to the OMB because its impact cuts across several federal agencies.

The spokeswoman said the agency had no idea when OMB would release it, allowing publication.  Neither agency would discuss what changes had been made to the draft.

Some present and former EPA staffers, who asked not to be named for fear of losing their jobs, blamed the sidetracking of the report on heightened political pressure during the campaign season.  The OMB has been slow to approve environmental regulations and other EPA reports throughout the Obama Administration — as it was under George W. Bush, according to reports by the Center for Progressive Reform, a nonprofit consortium of scholars who do research on health, safety and environmental issues.

“Why is it taking so long? One must ask the question,” said a former EPA researcher who works on children’s health issues. “It is an important document and it strikes me that it’s falling victim to politics.”

The EPA states that the report is intended, in part, to help policymakers identify and evaluate ways to minimize environmental impacts on children. That’s an unwelcome prospect to the $674 billion chemical  industry, which stands to lose business and face greater legal liability if the EPA or Congress bans certain substances mentioned in the report or sets standards reducing the levels of exposure that is considered safe.

Among other findings, the report links numerous substances to ADHD, including certain widely available pesticides;  polychlorinated biphenyls  (PCBs), which were banned in 1979 but are still present in products made before then and in the environment; certain polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), used as flame retardants; and methyl mercury, a toxic metal that accumulates in larger fish, such as tuna. The draft also cites children’s exposure to lead, particularly from aging lead water pipes, as a continuing problem (See Toxic Taps.)

Among the other widespread contaminants linked to learning disabilities is perchlorate, a component of rocket fuel, fireworks and other industrial products, which has polluted water around the country. The Department of Defense, which wants to avoid paying to clean it up, is alarmed by research showing that the chemical interferes with thyroid function and otherwise damages the nervous system, according to R. Thomas Zoeller, a biology professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and an expert on perchlorate, who has served on EPA advisory panels studying toxic chemicals. The Air Force is so concerned about the issue that it hired two contractors, Richard D. Mavis and John N. Sesso, who in 2009 defended the chemical in a letter to the prestigious journal Environmental Health Perspectives, which had published an EPA scientist’s study noting that perchlorate impaired brain function.

One of the new sections of the report notes that children may be widely exposed to pollutants in schools and day-care centers. Among them are pesticides; lead; PCBs; asbestos, a mineral fiber long used as insulation and fire-proofing; phthalates, chemicals that are used to soften vinyl and as solvents and fixers, and are found in numerous consumer goods, among them: toys, perfumes, medical devices, shower curtains and detergents; and perfluorinated chemicals, which are used in non-stick and stain-proof products.  The study notes that these substances are variously associated with asthma, cancer, reproductive toxicity and hormone disruption.

Read the Full Article here: http://investigativereportingworkshop.org/investigations/toxic-influence/story/white-house-stalls-critical-epa-report-highlightin/

Home Safe Home

Home%20Safe%20Home White House stalls critical EPA report highlighting chemical dangers to children

Learn about the health effects and safe alternatives
for more than 100 common household products!

0 commentsback to post

Other articlesgo to homepage

The Natural Method to Improve Vision that was Banned in NY

The Natural Method to Improve Vision that was Banned in NY

Wouldn’t it be wonderful to be able to see clearly without glasses or contacts? According to Greg Marsh, a certified natural vision coach, clear vision is achievable by virtually everyone, even if you’re already wearing strong corrective lenses.

Black Cumin Seeds Better Than Drugs? A Look at  the Science

Black Cumin Seeds Better Than Drugs? A Look at the Science

Black cumin seeds and black cumin seed oil have been widely used for reducing blood pressure, cleansing and tonifying the liver, reducing fluid retention, supporting healthy digestion, treating diarrhea, stimulating the appetite, reducing pain, and treating skin disorders. Studies have confirmed numerous pharmacological benefits. Black cumin seeds are also called Nigella sativa seeds. These seeds have anti-diabetic and anti-cancer properties. They can be used to regulate the immune system, reduce pain, kill microorganisms, reduce inflammation, inhibit spasmodic activity, and open the tiny air passages in the lungs. Black seed oil protects the liver, the kidneys, and the stomach/ digestive system. It is a powerful antioxidant.

Children Raised on Small Dairy Farms Develop 90% Fewer Allergies

Children Raised on Small Dairy Farms Develop 90% Fewer Allergies

A new study published in Sweden shows that children who live on small dairy farms run one-tenth the risk of developing allergies as other children. This study confirms the same results observed among small Amish dairy farms last year, where the drinking of farm-fresh raw milk was shown to be a cure for many allergies. The authors of the study suspect that the development of a healthy gut flora, as a result from living on the farm and being exposed to many different types of bacteria, is a major factor in developing immunity to allergies.

How Chili Peppers Can Be Used to Treat Pain

How Chili Peppers Can Be Used to Treat Pain

Chili peppers’ heat comes from capsaicin, a compound produced to protect them from fungal attack.

Capsaicin is available in pain-relieving creams and patches, and has shown promise for relieving shingles pain, osteoarthritis, psoriasis symptoms, and more.

Capsaicin has both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and has also shown some promise for cancer, weight loss, and allergy symptoms.

Study: Rosemary Herb Reduces Cognitive Decline in Elderly

Study: Rosemary Herb Reduces Cognitive Decline in Elderly

‘Rosemary Is For Remembrance’ ~ Science Confirms Wisdom of the Ancients By Sayer Ji GreenMedInfo.com “There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance…” ~ William Shakespeare Since ancient times, herbs have been appreciated for their profound therapeutic effects.Science as a form of evidence-gathering did not take the epistemological pole position until quite recently in cultural history, with the

read more


Get the news right in your inbox!