October 22, 2014

Soy protein present in egg yolks and chicken tissues

pin it button Soy protein present in egg yolks and chicken tissues

dozen soy free organic eggs 300x166 Soy protein present in egg yolks and chicken tissues

Health Impact News

There is a growing market today of consumers trying to avoid soy in their diet. Many people have developed soy allergies, and a number of people are concerned about the plant estrogen properties of soy protein. Soy protein is linked to the rise in hypothyroidism, early puberty in young girls, and lower testosterone levels in men, among other problems. Much of this research is documented in Dr. Kaayla Daniel’s book “The Whole Soy Story.”

What most people do not realize, however, is that due to the predominance of soy in animal feeds, soy protein is probably present in your food even if it is not listed as an ingredient anywhere. Very little testing has been done to determine if the soy protein from the animal feed is passed into the end products we consume. Most laboratories do not even have tests available to test for this.

Professor M. Monica Giusti, a poultry biologist of The Ohio State University, is one of the few people who has done research on soy isoflavones appearing in commercial egg yolks. She has designed lab tests to detect soy isoflavones. In 2009 one of her students published a master’s thesis on the transfer of the soy protein into egg yolks and chicken tissue: Quantification of Soy Isoflavones in Commercial Eggs and Their Transfer from Poultry Feed into Eggs and Tissues. The results of the study as stated in the abstract:

Isoflavones are potent phytoestrogens found in soybeans. Soybean meal constitutes a main ingredient of poultry feed and isoflavones may transfer into eggs and tissues. Our objective was to determine the transfer and accumulation of isoflavones from the feed into hen eggs and tissues, making them isoflavone sources in the human diet. Isoflavone content of commercial eggs with different claims were analyzed by HPLC-MS after hydrolysis. All commercial samples contained soy isoflavones and the metabolite equol. Then, 48 laying hens were fed soy-free, regular (25% soybean meal) or isoflavonerich diet. Isoflavones were found in experimental eggs and tissues. Enhancement of the diet with 500 mg isoflavones/100g feed resulted on egg yolks containing 1000μg isoflavones/100g while livers, kidneys, hearts and muscles contained 7162 μg/100g, 3355 μg/100g , 272 μg/100g and 97 μg/100g , respectively. The results showed that diet can be altered to modulate isoflavone content in hen eggs and tissues.

The author of the study has a pro-soy view of soy protein, so the study was designed to encourage more soy protein to be transferred to egg yolks and poultry tissue. The parameters of the study included comparing chickens fed a soy-free feed, and at the time Tropical Traditions’ soy-free Cocofeed was the only feed available for them to use. Since they started with laying hens that had been raised on a soy-based diet, they conducted periodic tests to determine how long it took the soy-protein to not show up in egg yolks after starting on the soy-free Cocofeed. No trace of the soy isoflavone was found after 10 days following the conversion to the soy-free Cocofeed.

So if you think you are allergic to eggs, it could be that you are actually allergic to soy protein, which is present in virtually all commercial eggs, including organic ones.

Tropical Traditions currently sells its soy-free feed from a feed mill in southwestern Wisconsin, and is currently in the process of having a feed mill on the west coast also have it available. They can be contacted here. In addition to their soy-free eggs, Tropical Traditions sells chickens and turkeys raised on their soy-free Cocofeed from their Grassfed Traditions website.

pasturedpoultrymed 270x300 Soy protein present in egg yolks and chicken tissues

Purchase soy-free organic eggs!


0 commentsback to post

Other articlesgo to homepage

Repairing your Microbiome: Making Kefir at Home

Repairing your Microbiome: Making Kefir at Home

Pin It

Cultured dairy is a traditional food in many cultures. When refrigeration isn’t available fresh milk can only keep for a couple of days before it spontaneously cultures, as in sour or clabbered milk. Adding a starter culture – be it from a previous batch or other source – has long been the method of creating consistent flavors and textures in ones cultured milk.

Milk kefir is one of these cultures. Thought to originate in the Caucuses Mountains, this culture is added to fresh milk and allowed to culture for 12-24 hours, sometimes even longer, and results in a tangy, flavorful milk with the consistency of a pourable yogurt.

Milk kefir has many health benefits, and can be made at home.

How to Make a Gluten Free Cheesecake

How to Make a Gluten Free Cheesecake

Pin It

Cheesecakes are a classic dessert, with many different flavor variations and types. For those on a gluten free diet, finding a 100% gluten free cheesecake recipe that doesn’t skimp on flavor or texture, and still blows you away, can be a bit of a challenge. Many popular cheesecakes like the New York style use a bit of flour in the filling, and the classic graham crust is hard to replace. Even though gluten free grahams are available to purchase, they are loaded with highly processed ingredients and are better off not being touched. Meanwhile, the alternative, making them yourself, is extremely time consuming.

There is however, a very easy solution: make a shortbread crust and nix the gluten flours. Shortbread crusts are light, buttery, very quick and easy to make, and compliment any flavor of cheesecake. Here’s how you make one.

Simple Fermented Carrot Sticks and the Two Types of Fermented Vegetables

Simple Fermented Carrot Sticks and the Two Types of Fermented Vegetables

Pin It

Most of us are familiar with sauerkraut, kimchi, and cucumber pickles as forms of fermented vegetables. Or we are, at the very least familiar with the store-bought vinegar-brined modern day versions of what once were lactic acid fermented vegetables.

But you can ferment just about any vegetable, turning it into a lively probiotic-rich snack, condiment, or enzymatic addition to your meals. Here is a simple recipe you can make at home for fermented carrot sticks.

How to Use Raw Honey in Place of Sugar in Baking

How to Use Raw Honey in Place of Sugar in Baking

Pin It

Raw honey is one of the healthiest sweeteners readily available for use in baking. Honey is a much better choice than processed sugar. Granulated sugar made from cane sugar is actually a natural product. However, most types of granulated sugars in the market go through a refining process which strips out most of the natural nutrients.

In addition, granulated sugar from sugar beets is more than likely from a GMO source. If you do use granulated sugar in your recipes, make sure it is organic cane sugar as close to its original source as possible, which is usually very dark and dry.

You’re better off using raw honey, which is a whole food that in its natural state needs no further refining. And its healthier too! The information here will show you how to replace sugar in your baked goods with raw honey.

How to Make Your Own Sauerkraut

How to Make Your Own Sauerkraut

Pin It

There are many ways to preserve food these days. Freezing is popular for its convenience. Canning is gaining resurgence, and rightfully so, for its place in a local and sustainable food economy. Drying fruits and vegetables continues to be a simple way to put food up, especially in hotter, drier climates.

And then there is lactic acid fermentation, also known as lacto-fermentation. If you’ve ever had unpasteurized sauerkraut or true sour pickles, then you’ve eaten fermented vegetables. These are hard to come by, though, in their true raw form so it is helpful if you know how to make them at home.

This article will show just how easy it is make your own raw sauerkraut at home with only 2 ingredients.

read more


Get the news right in your inbox!