Can Cannabis Help Reverse Alzheimer’s?

Alzheimer's Disease and other forms of dementia have become increasingly epidemic among our expanding age 65 and over population. As of 2015, there are 5.3 million Americans diagnosed with Alzheimer's. At least a third of them don't know they are afflicted. Dementia and Alzheimer's are worsening epidemics, and the pharmaceutical industry has not provided real hope. One has to go outside of mainstream medicine's pharmacopoeia to slow or reverse dementia and Alzheimer's or other neurodegenerative diseases such as MS and Parkinson's. Health Impact News has been a leader in the Alternative Media documenting cases where coconut oil has brought tremendous results to those suffering from Alzheimer's and dementia, and the research and case studies are found at CoconutOil.com. Another alternative for Alzheimer's is one that still has legal issues in many states - it's cannabis or medical marijuana. It doesn't have to be smoked. There are edible options available. It may seem that using cannabis to reduce Alzheimer's symptoms is counter intuitive. But in addition to many anecdotal successes with cannabis for Alzheimer's and dementia, there has been some serious research.

Cannabis for the Treatment of Epilepsy, and More

Many drugs are developed not because there's a great medical need, but rather because there's big money to be made from them. In many cases, holistic therapies and medicines already exist that can take the place of any number of synthetic pharmaceuticals. Cannabis is one such therapy, and according to Dr. Gedde, "it's time to ask questions and look at a new way of thinking about this plant." A wealth of research shows marijuana does indeed have outstanding promise as a medicinal plant, largely due to its cannabidiol (CBD) content. Cannabinoids interact with your body by way of naturally occurring cannabinoid receptors embedded in cell membranes throughout your body. There are cannabinoid receptors in your brain, lungs, liver, kidneys, immune system, and more. Both the therapeutic and psychoactive properties of marijuana occur when a cannabinoid activates a cannabinoid receptor. According to Dr. Gedde, cannabis is certainly far safer than most prescription drugs, and there's enough information to compare it against the known toxicities of many drugs currently in use. This includes liver and kidney toxicity, gastrointestinal damage, nerve damage and, of course, death. Moreover, cannabidiol and other cannabis products often work when other medications fail, so not only are they generally safer, cannabis preparations also tend to provide greater efficacy.

Majority of Physicians in U.S. Now Favor Medical Cannabis

The use of marijuana for medical purposes is now legal in 23 states and, as of this writing, 9 states have pending legislation or ballot measures to legalize medical marijuana. Estimates are that between 85 and 95 percent of Americans are in favor of medical cannabis, and nearly 60 percent support complete legalization of marijuana. And doctors agree. In 2014, a survey found that the majority of physicians—56 percent—favor nationwide legalization of medical cannabis, with support being highest among oncologists and hematologists. However, many families are still unable, legally or otherwise, to obtain this herbal treatment. Families with a sick child are being forced to split up, just so that one parent can live in a place where medical cannabis can be legally obtained in order to help their child.

Feds Say Cannabis Is Not Medicine While Holding The Patent on Cannabis as Medicine

Ben Swann travels to Colorado to learn the truth about cannabis as medicine and what government isn't telling you.

Study: Legalizing Medical Marijuana Leads to Fewer Prescription Drug Overdose Deaths

A study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine on Monday found that states that had legalized medical marijuana had seen a 25 percent drop in deaths related to prescription drug overdoses. According to ABC News, the researchers conducting the study found that because “legalizing medical marijuana makes it more available to chronic pain patients, it provides a potentially less lethal alternative to pain control on a long-term basis.” Over the course of the study, the states studied were the ones that allowed access to medical marijuana. The Washington Post reported that those states “had 1,729 fewer overdose deaths in 2010 than would be predicted by trends in states without such laws.” Dr. Marcus Bachhuber, a physician and researcher at the University of Pennsylvania, and the lead author of the study, told ABC News that while he did expect to see changes among the states that legalized medical marijuana, he found it “surprising that the difference is so big.”

E-Cigarettes More Toxic and Dangerous than Real Cigarettes

The highly toxic liquid in e-cigarettes is responsible for a surge of child poisonings; just one teaspoon may be enough to kill your child. E-cigarettes may contain toxic agents manufacturers are reluctant to disclose, such as lead, benzene, toluene, and formaldehyde.

Medical Cannabis is a Threat to the Pharmaceutical Industry

Medical marijuana, or cannabis, is legal in 20 US states, where it is used for a variety of medical conditions such as mood disorders, pain disorders, multiple sclerosis, and even cancer. Parents of children with epilepsy met at a news conference to share their dismay that Governor Mark Dayton refuses to legalize medical marijuana. About 85 percent to 95 percent of Americans are in favor of medical cannabis, and nearly 60 percent are in favor of legalizing marijuana. Cannabis shows outstanding promise as a medicinal plant, largely due to its cannabidiol (CBD) content. Cannabinoids interact with your body by way of naturally occurring cannabinoid receptors embedded in cell membranes throughout your body.

Medical Cannabis: The REAL Reason the Government Wants to Keep it Banned

“Cannabis” refers to the plant that is commonly called "marijuana." The two terms are often used interchangeably. However, "cannabis" is the historical name that has been used in the medical literature. While public sentiments towards marijuana have recently changed to the point where two states have now voted to make it legal for recreational use, few people understand the actual history of cannabis as a medical plant in the United States, and how it came to be classified as an illegal drug. It is crucial to understand this history in order to fully understand what is happening at the state and national level with regards to both medical cannabis and recreational marijuana. Did you know that medical cannabis at one time was a widely prescribed drug in the U.S., and that physicians were originally opposed to its regulation? Did you know that while the U.S. government continues to list cannabis as a Schedule 1 illegal drug preventing doctors from prescribing it because it supposedly has no therapeutic value, that the government is also patenting drugs based on cannabis? What about recent laws passed to legalize the recreational use of marijuana: are these good or bad for medical cannabis use? Learn all this and more: