Study: Youngest Children in Classrooms Frequently Mislabeled as ADHD – Drugged

A recent study made some international mainstream papers recently that warned of medicating children misdiagnosed as ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder), simply because they were the youngest students in their class. UK’s online Daily Mail included a quote from the lead author of that study, Dr. Martin Whitely, who stated: "It appears that across the globe some teachers are mistaking the immaturity of the youngest children in their class for ADHD. Although teachers don’t diagnose it, they are often the first to suggest a child may have ADHD." The study was published by the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines on October 14, 2018, with the title: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder late birthdate effect common in both high and low prescribing international jurisdictions: systematic review. The “late birthdate” label describes situations where a child’s birthday falls on a later date of the year than most of his or her classmates’ birthdays. This potentially places that child at a less mature stage of development as the others in the same class. A description of a child’s behavior considered ADHD leads to a prescription of pharmaceutical psychotropic drugs that mimic cocaine and amphetamine, even to children four years old and younger. The researches examined 19 studies in 13 countries that looked into over-diagnosing school children as ADHD, and they added another three studies that were related to bring the total studies reviewed at 22. Because the 22 studies used too many divergent methods, the review authors used the systemic review method, which examines each study individually, instead of the meta-analysis method, which combines the statistics from the studies reviewed to form an opinion or conclusion. They concluded: "It is the norm internationally for the youngest children in a classroom to be at increased risk of being medicated for ADHD, even in jurisdictions with relatively low prescribing rates."

Another Mass Shooting, Another Psychiatric Drug—27 Drug Warnings and 1,531 Cases of Drug Related Shootings

Twenty-seven drug regulatory agency warnings cite psychiatric drug side effects of mania, psychosis, violence and homicidal ideation; 1,531 cases of psychiatric drug induced homicide/homicidal ideation have been reported to the US FDA; 65 high profile cases of mass shootings/murder have been committed by individuals under the influence of these drugs, yet there has never been a federal investigation into the link between seemingly senseless acts of violence and the use of mind-altering psychotropic drugs. Paul Harasim from the Las Vegas Review-Journal obtained records from the Nevada Prescription Monitoring Program showing Stephen Paddock was prescribed 50 10-milligram diazepam (Valium) tablets on June 21st, as well as 50 10-milligram tablets in 2016. The drug Paddock was prescribed, diazepam, is a benzodiazepine documented by several studies to cause violence, aggression, homicidal ideation and suicide risk or attempts.

Prescription Drugs Now Factor in Higher Percentage of Fatal Car Crashes Than Alcohol or Marijuana

Prescription drugs and multiple drug combinations are frequently found in the blood of drivers involved in fatal car crashes on US roads, according to a new study in Public Health Reports. Drivers today are more likely to test positive for drugs than drivers 20 years ago, and drugged drivers are now likely to be older than 50. Gone are the days when drunk drivers were our only concern—alcohol is but one of MANY drugs that can make you dangerous behind the wheel. And now many people are on multiple drug cocktails, especially prescription drugs, which multiplies their impairment.

Number of 0-5 Year Olds on Psychotropic Drugs Skyrockets 42% Since 2009

While the national media has been running that the use of psychotropic drugs in children has decreased based on a “sample study” of only 43,000 kids, the fact is, according to data obtained from IMS Health, the number of children 0-5 on psychiatric drugs has increased 42% since 2009. In 2012, there were 1,085,410 children aged 0-5 on psychiatric drugs, which is the highest the number has been in the last decade.