Big Pharma Failing Diabetics: Diabetes Can Be Prevented, Controlled, and Reversed Naturally

Celebrity doctor Mehmet Oz exclaimed on national TV not long ago, “Alarm bells are ringing. The CDC estimates that one third of all Americans will develop diabetes and will live 15 years less and lose quality of life. No public health problem compares in scale.” The burgeoning diabetes epidemic comes mostly in the form of type 2 diabetes. Of the 29.1 million cases of diabetes estimated in 2014, only 1.25 million were type 1 diabetic, less than five percent. Type 2 diabetes is actually a life style disease, preventable with proper exercise and diet, and even reversible the same way. Pharmaceutical medications for type 2 diabetes rarely if ever improve that condition, and their side effects are actually precursors for other diseases, even cancer. A type 2 diabetic prescribed insulin will most likely become type 1 diabetic instead of curing type 2. Diabetes 2 is happening among a large portion of our population who are victims of SAD, the Standard American Diet of processed and fast foods as well as other poor and sedentary lifestyle choices. And injecting insulin for type 2 diabetics, though sometimes prescribed, is decried as the wrong approach by others who consider it like pouring kerosene on a fire to put it out.

Saturated Fat Helps Avoid Diabetes

About one in three Americans now has diabetes or pre-diabetes. That's nearly 80 million people, the majority of whom suffer from type 2 diabetes – a preventable and, often, reversible condition. The problem is that many Americans are unaware that the foods they're eating could be setting them up for a dietary disaster, and this isn't their fault. Public health guidelines condemn healthy fats from foods like butter and full-fat dairy and recommend whole grains and cereals – the opposite of what a person with diabetes, or any person really, needs to stay healthy. For the last 50 years, Americans have been told to eat a high complex carbohydrate, low saturated fat diet. Even diabetics have been told to eat 50 to 60 percent of their daily calories in the form of processed carbs! Research, including a new study involving dolphins, again suggests that this movement away from traditional full-fat foods is contributing to the rising rates of diabetes and metabolic syndrome across the globe.

What the Science Says About Intermittent Fasting

It's long been known that calorie restriction can increase the lifespan of certain animals. More recent research suggests that intermittent fasting can provide the same health benefits as constant calorie restriction, which may be helpful for those who cannot successfully reduce their everyday calorie intake. Both intermittent fasting and continuous calorie restriction have been shown to produce weight loss and improve metabolic disease risk markers. However, intermittent fasting tends to be slightly more effective for reducing insulin resistance.

Study Finds Intermittent Fasting Reduces Heart Disease

by Cynthia M Kroeger, Monica C Klempel, Surabhi Bhutani, John F Trepanowski, Christine C Tangney and Krista A Varady
Nutrition & Metabolism.com
Abstract (provisional)
Background
The ability of an intermittent fasting (IF)-calorie restriction (CR) regimen (with or without liquid meals) to modulate adipokines in a way that is protective against coronary heart disease (CHD) has yet to be tested.

Objective
Accordingly, […]