California Uses Dogs to Sniff Out and Destroy Consumer Soy-free Egg Shipments

Earlier this year (March 2017) we reported how the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture issued "cease and desist" orders to a few small-scale Amish egg farmers in Wisconsin who have been shipping soy-free cage-free eggs to customers across the U.S. for over 7 years. The main complaint from the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture was that they were shipping the eggs to the consumers unrefrigerated. It was discovered that the complaint did not originate from any customers, but from the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA). CDFA had previously seized shipments of these farm eggs back in 2012, and were apparently upset that they were coming into California unrefrigerated. The farmers and representatives from Tropical Traditions/Healthy Traditions worked with the Wisconsin regulators, who responded appropriately and allowed the farmers to continue shipping their eggs. They met with the farmers, and the farmers agreed to make some minor adjustments to comply with Wisconsin State regulations. However, California CDFA was not through. Even though there is no record of any customer complaint about the Wisconsin eggs, they used a Dog Team to sniff out a consumer box of eggs at a FedEx facility and destroy them. Does CDFA have the right to search and destroy private property in a FedEx facility? Will they also begin searching automobiles and other vehicles entering the state of California for food that does not meet their regulatory standards? Is this a good use of taxpayer funds?

The War Against Small Family Farms in the U.S.

Both the USDA and FDA seem to focus on protecting factory farming and all the industries that contribute to BigAg and Big Dairy from competition by smaller healthier operations. They do this by enforcing regulations meant for factory farms and CAFOs (Confined Animal Feeding Operations), which by their very vastness and economics need to be regulated since they are breeding grounds for disease. This holds true for foods that most urban shoppers take for granted, eggs and milk. Using the cover of "protecting human health," these agencies force operations to protect against foodborne pathogens that often don’t work or are not necessary with good farming practices. We, consumers, get less nutrition from those milk and egg products but Big Ag thrives. One way to continue "business as usual" is to prevent the rising demand for healthier milk and eggs that encourage small dairies and egg producers to have any market presence. We should have the right to choose and support better farming.

Wisconsin Shuts Down Soy-free Egg Market: Denies Consumers Choice to Purchase Healthy Eggs

People with allergies to soy protein now have one less source for purchasing soy-free eggs. Two small-scale farmers in Wisconsin have been informed by the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture that they must stop selling their soy-free and GMO-tested eggs to consumers until they meet state government regulations for shipping eggs that they allege the farmers are violating. They have been shipping their eggs directly to the homes of customers throughout the United States since the beginning of 2010. In letters dated, March 13, 2017, the State of Wisconsin sent two farmers who are part of the Wisconsin Pasturelands Cooperative a Cease and Desist order regarding their eggs. The two farmers were informed that they were selling eggs and shipping them to consumers without proper refrigeration during shipping. They were specifically instructed that until this situation is corrected, “you shall not hold, process, package or sell the eggs for human consumption from your home or any other location.” The farmer cooperative run by Amish in rural Wisconsin since 2010 has been working together with an Internet business, Tropical Traditions (now Healthy Traditions), to market their eggs from cage-free chickens fed a specially developed feed that contains no soy, no corn, and ingredients that are tested to be free from GMOs and the herbicide glyphosate. They are believed to be one of the first ones in the U.S. to offer eggs from chickens on a soy-free diet. The eggs were marketed under the Grass-fed Traditions brand, which is now part of the Healthy Traditions product line offering alternatives to commodity food. Healthy Traditions tests their products for the presence of GMOs and the herbicide glyphosate. While the State of Wisconsin is claiming that the farmers are violating regulations for the refrigerated transportation of eggs, there is no indication that these regulations apply to consumers transporting their own eggs, whether they are transporting the eggs themselves directly from the farm, or paying someone else to ship them on their behalf.

Organic, Cage-Free, Free-Range or Pastured: Sorting Through the Confusion on Egg Labels

Organic, Cage-Free, Free-Range, or Pasture-Raised Eggs? Dr. Mercola does a good job of defining some of the many terms used to label and market eggs. However, not only is the amount of free-range pasture an egg-laying chicken has access to important, but the quality of their feed as well, as the feed makes up the majority of their diet, even in pasture-based operations. Tests conducted at The Ohio State University have shown that chickens fed a high concentration of soybeans, will pass on the soy protein to the egg yolks of chickens. Hence, if soy is something you are allergic to or trying to avoid in your diet, you may not even realize that you are getting soy protein from your eggs – even organic pastured eggs!

Is the FDA Trying to Destroy the Pastured Egg Industry?

Recent guidance from the FDA will place an impossible burden on farmers who raise true free-range chickens. The FDA guidance suggests that farmers must cover their outdoor pastures with either roofing or netting, or use noise cannons to scare away wild birds. Perhaps it has escaped FDA that noise cannons would also scare the chickens? Or that putting a roof over a multi-acre pasture is not only cost-prohibitive, but would prevent rain and sun from reaching the living things in the pasture? The FDA also advocates walls around the pasture, to prevent mice, rats, and cats from entering, and then put a roof over it. That’s right—walls and roofing. In other words, they want the chickens to be kept in a building! This completely contradicts what “free-range” is supposed to be about!

Is it True that Eggs are as Bad for Your Arteries as Smoking?

 

By Dr. Mercola

Recently, news headlines were ablaze with startling information that eggs are nearly as bad for your arteries as cigarettes. After surveying more than 1,200 seniors, the researchers concluded that eating egg yolks on a regular basis is approximately two-thirds as bad as smoking with regards to the build-up of arterial plaque.1

That’s an […]

Soy-free Chicken Feed Developed with Coconut Pulp for Soy-free Eggs

by Grassfed Traditions
Soy has become a big part of the human diet post World War II, with the result that there are many people with soy allergies today, and many people today are trying to reduce or eliminate soy protein from their diet. (See the book The Whole Soy Story.) Soy is the […]

Eggs – Consume this natural protein source

by Shona Botes
(NaturalNews) The past 20 years have unfortunately seen eggs getting a bad rap for contributing to high cholesterol levels in people. But after scientists at the Harvard School of Public Health decided to do extensive research and follow the diet of 117 000 nurses over an eight to 14 year period, they […]

The Truth about Eggs and Cholesterol

by Dr. Malcom Kendrick, M.D. and Dr. Duane Graveline, M.D., M.P.H.

According to the U.S. Government’s latest guidelines, one egg per day does not result in increased blood cholesterol levels. Nor does it increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in normal people.

What it might have said is that 12 eggs per day […]

Eat Eggs Not Cereal For Breakfast

by Diet Heart Publishing

Emphasizing healthy natural fat and complete protein is the best way to start you day. We need – on average – 30 grams of protein before noon each day. If there is a perfect protein food, eggs would top the list. Eggs contain all eight essential amino acids and are a […]