Research Continues to Confirm Coconut Oil’s Healing Properties for Diabetes

When we published our book on Virgin Coconut Oil back in 2004, we devoted a whole chapter to diabetes, based on research and testimonials from coconut oil consumers. That chapter also exists as an article on the CoconutOil.com website. The article has testimonials for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Peer-reviewed published research here in 2017 continues to confirm that coconut oil is the dietary oil of choice for those who suffer from diabetes.

Study: Coconut Oil Offers Protection Against Inflammation and Diabetes

Forty percent of women today are obese. Many believe obesity is a precursor to diabetes, which if not reversed will lead to further health complications, and even be life threatening. However, a recent study looking at the effects of coconut oil on glycemia and inflammation demonstrated that obesity alone may not be the culprit. What the researchers discovered indicates that inflammation has a greater impact on insulin resistance and high blood sugar than excess fat. This could be argued, since adipose fats do release toxins over time that do create inflammation. But there are diabetes 2 patients who are not obese. Obesity in women has also been considered a factor in infertility, which this study also attempted to determine. Inadvertently, the study’s findings disclosed even more about the health protective qualities of coconut oil.

Scientific Evidence that Turmeric Helps Diabetes

Past research clearly demonstrates that turmeric is a powerful natural preventative and therapeutic agent for diabetes 2. The most commonly prescribed pharmaceutical approach with diabetes 2 or diabetes myelitis (DM) is Metformin, which is fraught with side effects even though it is considered safer than other diabetic drugs with worse side effects. The whole time Metformin and other more toxic diabetes drugs were on the market gathering heat from class action lawsuits for serious side effects, there has been research proving the efficacy and safety of turmeric or its extracted active ingredient curcumin on both preventing diabetes among prediabetic persons, and reversing diabetes type 2 among those afflicted.

Cannabis Treats Diabetes and Protects Against Obesity

How counter-intuitive can one get? Everybody knows marijuana users get the “munchies,” which are usually satisfied with high calorie low nutrient foods. It's also somewhat accepted by mainstream oncology that cannabis curbs chemo patients' nausea and boosts their appetites. Yet studies demonstrate that even recreational pot users have a considerably lower incidence of obesity and metabolic syndrome, which often leads to diabetes 2. These published peer reviewed studies are a small sampling of international studies from Israel, Spain, Italy, and the USA among others that have looked into various applications of cannabis for treatments for other diseases with positive results. Yet, the DEA Controlled Substance Schedule 1 rating for cannabis of dangerous, addictive, and without medical merit stands as of this writing. Apparently, the Justice Department that governs the DEA is trying to protect the pharmaceutical industry, not ordinary citizens.

Full-Fat Dairy Healthier than Low-Fat Dairy: Eating High Fat Linked to Lower Risk for Diabetes

The number of people with type 2 diabetes equals 9.3 percent of the population of the U.S. or 29 million people. This is an increase from the 2010 estimate of 26 million people. Another 86 million people have pre-diabetes, where their blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed with diabetes. If those with pre-diabetes do not make changes to their diet and exercise habits, between 15 percent and 30 percent will develop diabetes within the next five years. These numbers are overwhelming when you consider the complications related to diabetes have an impact on the individual, the family and the workforce. Diabetes is a serious health condition with serious complications. Without consistent blood sugar control, excess glucose in your blood causes damage to your heart, blood vessels, kidneys, eyes, gums, teeth and neurological system. The advice to eat low-fat foods and dairy products originated as far back as the late 1950s and early 1960s. A single research study performed by an economist proposed that high-fat diets were the cause of most heart disease, stroke and high cholesterol levels. Before that study, and since, other well-designed and peer-reviewed studies have refuted that evidence.

Virgin Coconut Oil Helps Reduce Diabetes

A recent study from India published in the Journal of Food Science Technology showed positive results in improving glucose metabolism in high fructose diets in rats. Coconut oil is a common dietary oil in South India, so the researchers wanted to compare the common refined copra-based coconut oil found in the market place with the less-refined "virgin" coconut oil which has become more readily available in recent years. The results were very promising. The researchers found that glucose metabolism only increased 17% in a high-fructose diet as compared to 46% for those rates fed a standard coconut oil diet. This research confirms what we have observed over the years since we brought Virgin Coconut Oil into the U.S. market: many who switch to Virgin Coconut Oil see their blood sugar levels normalize. Here are some testimonials.

Soda Industry Dying as Americans Seek Healthy Beverages that Don’t Cause Diabetes, Obesity

Americans are finally waking up to the fact that drinking soda is an unhealthy practice. Sales of sugary, carbonated drinks have fallen dramatically in recent years, sending the soda industry into a panic. A recent piece in The New York Times by Margot Sanger-Katz details the decline in soda sales and the efforts that led to it.

Saturated Fat Helps Avoid Diabetes

About one in three Americans now has diabetes or pre-diabetes. That's nearly 80 million people, the majority of whom suffer from type 2 diabetes – a preventable and, often, reversible condition. The problem is that many Americans are unaware that the foods they're eating could be setting them up for a dietary disaster, and this isn't their fault. Public health guidelines condemn healthy fats from foods like butter and full-fat dairy and recommend whole grains and cereals – the opposite of what a person with diabetes, or any person really, needs to stay healthy. For the last 50 years, Americans have been told to eat a high complex carbohydrate, low saturated fat diet. Even diabetics have been told to eat 50 to 60 percent of their daily calories in the form of processed carbs! Research, including a new study involving dolphins, again suggests that this movement away from traditional full-fat foods is contributing to the rising rates of diabetes and metabolic syndrome across the globe.

The Major Role Soybean Oil Plays in Obesity and Diabetes

Soybean oil is the most common oil used in the US, but this is a relatively new phenomenon. Prior to 1900, cooking was done with lard and butter, and the processed foods that are now primary sources of soybean oil (and other soy ingredients) were nonexistent. In the 1950s, saturated fats were condemned on the basis of them raising your cholesterol and causing heart disease – a theory that has since been proven wrong, but which is still lingering in medical offices and public nutrition regulations. Partially hydrogenated soybean oil was developed to replace saturated fats like butter and lard in the food supply. Not only did consumers embrace it, but food manufacturers did even more so because of its low cost, long shelf-life, and stability at room temperature. There was just one problem: partially hydrogenated oils are sources of trans fats, which are now known to cause chronic health problems such as obesity, asthma, auto-immune disease, cancer, and bone degeneration. Yet, even if you take the hydrogenation process out of the picture, soybean oil is still detrimental to your health. While trans fats are now being pulled out of processed foods due to their extreme health risks, soybean oil is still fair game… but it shouldn’t be – and here’s why.

Study: Soybean Oil Linked to Obesity and Diabetes More than Coconut Oil and Fructose

Scientists in California published a study investigating the effects of saturated versus unsaturated fat in the diets of mice, as well as fructose, on obesity and diabetes. The unsaturated fat was soybean oil, and the saturated fat was coconut oil, along with a fructose. Soybean oil came out the clear loser when looking at the dietary effect on obesity and diabetes.