News regarding the dangers of GMOs and biotech, and the advantages of organic sustainable agriculture.

Majority of Supermarket Meats Are Riddled With Superbugs

For a number of years now, researchers have warned we are headed toward a post-antibiotic world — a world in which infections that used to be easily treatable become death sentences as they can no longer be touched by available drugs. As reported by NPR July 2, 2018: "A woman in Nevada dies from a bacterial infection that was resistant to 26 different antibiotics. A U.K. patient contracts a case of multidrug-resistant gonorrhea never seen before. A typhoid superbug kills hundreds in Pakistan. These stories from recent years — and many others — raise fears about the possibility of a post-antibiotic world." Despite strong warnings, about 80 percent of the antibiotics sold in the U.S. are still given to livestock — not to treat acute infections but as a preventive measure, and as a growth promoter. This routine low-dose administration is a most dangerous practice, as it primes bacteria for resistance.

FREE Online Viewing of the Movie “Raising Meat Chickens”

Marjory Wildcraft, founder of The Grow Network, is offering a free online viewing of her entertaining, educational feature-length film "Raising Meat Chickens" from July 17, 2018 to July 19th. Marjory shows step-by-step how to raise up and humanely process a flock of birds over the course of four months . . . from mail-order chicks to meat in the freezer! For people who would like to take the bold step of processing their own birds but are afraid they might not have “what it takes” . . . this film will show them what is involved in the processing, and help them understand that backyard chickens are the most humane way to eat meat! This film will empower you with the detailed knowledge of exactly how to feed your family the highest quality chicken meat.

Judge: 300 Cases Against Monsanto Claiming Glyphosate Causes Cancer Can Continue

Hundreds of lawsuits against Monsanto Co by cancer survivors or families of those who died can proceed to trial, a federal judge ruled on Tuesday, finding there was sufficient evidence for a jury to hear the cases that blame the company's glyphosate-containing weed-killer for the disease. The decision by U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria in San Francisco followed years of litigation and weeks of hearings about the controversial science surrounding the safety of the chemical glyphosate, the key ingredient in Monsanto's top-selling weed-killer.

Antibiotic Catastrophe Being Hid from the Public

Antibiotic-resistant disease is a major health threat around the globe, such that illnesses once easily treatable with the drugs are now becoming deadly. The cause of the antibiotic-resistance epidemic is quite straightforward: overuse of antibiotics. “Resistant bacteria are more common in settings where antibiotics are frequently used: health care settings, the community and food animal production,” the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states — and the latter category is of utmost importance. The majority of antibiotics in the U.S. aren’t used in health care settings for humans; they’re used in industrial agriculture, primarily in low, steady doses for purposes of “disease prevention” (which also has the “side effect” of growth promotion, making the animals get bigger, faster). Despite this, exactly how and in what numbers antibiotics are used on U.S farms is a mystery, in large part because, as Wired put it, the data “isn’t considered an obligation owed to public health … it’s a political football.”

Criminal Fertilizer Company that Already Settled $2 BILLION Lawsuit Wants 18,000 More Acres in Florida

Most health conscious and environmentally concerned people understand the problems facing us today due to modern agricultural and biotech practices. In the U.S. today, less than 1% of our population is producing the food for the country. When the U.S. was founded, about 90% of the population was involved in agriculture, and by the time Abraham Lincoln became president, that number still stood at around 50% of the population producing food for the country. Today, traditional small-scale sustainable farming is rare and has been replaced by biotech and the mass production of food. GMO food, along with the contamination of the food supply by pesticides and herbicides, is fairly well known today. But there is one aspect of modern-day agriculture that often slips under the radar of public awareness that is as ecologically harmful to human health or even worse. It is the worldwide phosphate fertilizer industry. And it is especially out of control here in America, in China, and in other regions to lesser extents. Florida’s phosphate industries supply 75 percent of U.S. fertilizers. Now the world’s largest phosphate mining and manufacturing company, Mosaic Fertilizer, is looking to grab more land in Florida with the usual carrot of economic development, put simply, more local jobs. Those who know the history and methods of this industry are trying to convince ignorant citizens and county commissioners that the risks far outweigh the benefits promised, even if actually fulfilled. Mosaic Fertilizer has already settled a $2 billion lawsuit to clean up 60 billion pounds of hazardous waste in Florida and Louisiana - one of the largest federal lawsuits ever settled. Now it wants to grab even more land in Florida, seeking 18,000 acres for strip mining.

Contaminated Beer: Is It Still Possible to Find Good Beer Anywhere?

More bad news for beer drinkers! We have previously reported about the problem beer drinkers face today with most beers being contaminated with glyphosate, the active ingredient in the world's most used herbicide, Round Up. In the United States, beer makers have had a hard time finding uncontaminated barley, a staple in most beer making recipes. This is due to the fact that barley, along with other crops grown in the northern climates, is desiccated at harvest time with glyphosate to control the harvest before snow comes. A report out of Germany also confirmed that Germany's top beers, known world-wide for their high standards of quality, were also contaminated with glyphosate. Now, it is being reported that genetic engineers in California are developing a GMO version to hops, to create "fake beer."

German Company Bayer Approved to Buy Out Monsanto: “A Marriage Made in Hell”?

The recent Monsanto-Bayer merger has been approved by both American and European continent authorities, merging two of the world's top seed biotech companies and producers of genetically modified seeds. Bayer, a company based out of Germany, is a name most often associated with aspirin in the United States and around the world. But even before this merger, they already hold a huge market share of seed production. Bayer is somewhat constrained in developing their GMO products, as Germany bans the cultivation of GMO crops. Most of Bayer's GMO development is done in the USA, and by purchasing Monsanto, they will become, by far, the largest GMO company in the world. This has prompted some to refer to the Bayer-Monsanto merger as "A Marriage Made in Hell."

African Use of Ants and Intercropping to Fight Armyworm Pests in Corn Crops More Effective than GMOs

Recently GMWatch reported on attempts by the GMO lobby to persuade African countries to accept GM Bt maize to fight the fall armyworm pest, which is spreading across the continent and ravaging maize crops. But the lobbyists omitted to mention that GM Bt insecticidal maize targeting the fall armyworm has already failed in different regions due to pests becoming resistant to the GM Bt toxins in the crop. The lobbyists also ignored the fact that agroecological methods, such as attracting ants to feed on armyworm eggs, are proving successful. Now we've been alerted to another agroecological and non-GMO method that is working well in Africa as a defence against the fall armyworm. The method, a climate-adapted version of Push-Pull, is being spearheaded by the International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (icipe), a multinational government-funded organisation that supports poverty alleviation and food security.

Private Minneapolis Food Club Offering Direct-from-Farm Fresh Food Shut Down by Health Department

A local private buying club in Minneapolis, known as Uptown Locavore, was raided and shut down by the Health Department earlier this month (May, 2018). Even though there were apparently no complaints, and no one reporting any illness due to the food being sold in this private market, the city of Minneapolis decided to shut them down, stating that they did not have proper retail licenses, and that some of their food was "dangerous" because they were selling fresh raw milk and meat that had not been USDA inspected, according to ABC 5 KSTP. Will Winter, the owner of the market, links members of his buyer's club with up to 50 different farmers. He disagrees that the club was operating illegally without licenses, because it is not a retail store, but a private club. "The reason this is legal is it's a private transaction between consenting adults... Never a complaint, never made anyone sick, never had any questions about our food."

Will Monsanto Finally Stand Trial for Cancer-causing Herbicide Glyphosate?

A California Superior Court ruled last week that a man dying of cancer, who is suing Monsanto, can present evidence that Monsanto covered up research linking glyphosate to cancer. Glyphosate is the main ingredient in Roundup, the world's most prevalent herbicide used in agriculture, that has been found in 93% of Americans' urine, most mothers' breast milk, and is probably residing inside of every person alive on planet Earth. Provided that the trial will go forward without any more legal maneuvering by Monsanto, 46-year-old DeWayne Johnson, who has terminal cancer and only months left to live, will take the stand against Monsanto in a California court on June 18, in what is being called a "Landmark Lawsuit." Last week Judge Curtis Karnow issued an order clearing the way for jurors to consider not just scientific evidence related to what caused Johnson’s cancer, but allegations that Monsanto suppressed evidence of the risks of its weed killing products. Karnow ruled that the trial will proceed and a jury would be allowed to consider possible punitive damages. There are more than 4,000 other cancer victims who have filed lawsuits against Monsanto since the World Health Organization’s (WHO) International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) published a report linking glyphosate to non-Hodgkin lymphoma back in 2015. Therefore, should this case actually make it to trial, and DeWayne Johnson gets his day in court before a jury, it could set quite a precedent.