September 16, 2014

The Type of Fats and Carbs You Eat is Far More Important than the Amount

pin it button The Type of Fats and Carbs You Eat is Far More Important than the Amount

fatpyramid 300x225 The Type of Fats and Carbs You Eat is Far More Important than the Amount

Picture from The Healthy Skeptic

Health Impact News Editor Comment:

Chris Kresser has written an excellent article about how foods nourish us, examining the macronutrients such as fats and carbohydrates. He correctly points out how foolish it is to develop dietary guidelines that characterize certain classes of food all into one category, and gives examples of cultures around the world who thrive on native diets that would be considered unhealthy by mainstream diet theories in the US, which are heavily influenced by the pharmaceutical industry. If you follow Chris’ advice and the improved food pyramids (he has one for fats and another one for carbs) he has developed, your health will be in much better shape. He has an excellent section called “Know Your Fats” that gives a very good summary of the different classes of fats we need in our diet, including medium chain fatty acids from coconut oil. We are including some excerpts of his article here, but please click through to his site to read the entire article. It will be worth your time!

by The Healthy Skeptic

Note: This is the third article in an ongoing series called 9 Steps To Perfect Health. Make sure to check out the other articles when you’re finished with this one:

In step #1, we talked about what not to eat. In this article, we’ll talk about what to eat.

Most of the calories we get from food come from protein, carbohydrates and fat. These are referred to as macronutrients. We also get other important nutrients from food, such as vitamins and minerals. These don’t constitute a significant source of calories, so they’re called micronutrients.

For the last 50 years we’ve been told to follow a diet low in this or that macronutrient. From the 1950s up until the present day the American Heart Association and other similarly misguided and pharmaceutically-financed “consumer organizations” have advocated a low-fat diet. More recently, low-carbohydrate diets are all the rage.

NOT ALL MACRONUTRIENTS ARE CREATED EQUAL

The problem with these approaches is that they ignore the fact that not all macronutrients are created equal. There’s a tremendous variation in how different fats and carbohydrates affect the body, and thus in their suitability for human consumption. Grouping them all together in a single category is shortsighted – to say the least.

What many advocates of low-fat or low-carbohydrate diets conveniently ignore is that there are entire groups of people around the world, both past and present, that defy their ideas of what constitutes a healthy diet.

For example, the low-fat crowd will tell you that eating too much fat – especially of the saturated variety – will make you fat and give you a heart attack. Tell that to the traditional Inuit, who get about 90% of calories from fat, and were almost entirely free of obesity and modern degenerative disease. The same is true for the Masai tribe in Africa, who get about 60-70% of calories from fat (almost entirely from meat, milk or blood.) And then there’s the modern French, who have the lowest rate of heart disease of any industrialized country in the world – despite the highest intake of saturated fat.

The low-carb crowd is very much aware of these statistics, which are often used in defense of low-carb diets as the best choice. Tell that to the Kitavans in Melanesia, who get about 70% of calories from carbohydrate and, like the Inuit and Masai, are almost entirely free of obesity, heart disease and other chronic, degenerative diseases that are so common in industrialized societies. We see a similar absence of modern diseases in the Kuna indians in Panama and the Okinawans of Japan, two other healthy indigenous populations that get about 65% of calories from carbohydrate.

Read the Full Article Here: http://thehealthyskeptic.org/9-steps-to-perfect-health-2-nourish-your-body

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Making Your Own Fermented Berry Sauce

Making Your Own Fermented Berry Sauce

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With summer winding down, we are often finding ourselves surrounded by fruits and vegetables that need to be used up. The farmer’s markets are overflowing and perhaps our own backyard is giving up its own abundance.

There are many ways to preserve berries. Processing berries at home has a few distinct advantages. For one, you get to control the ingredients. Starting with organic berries is crucial and a huge improvement over most store-bought conventional jams and spreads.

Beyond making jam from your organically-sourced fruit, fruit sauce is another option. We are familiar with applesauce which is made by cooking peeled apples down into a thick sauce-like consistency. This can then be canned and stored away for winter.

This fermented fruit sauce is different from the familiar applesauce in that it is raw, never cooked, and imbued with a starter culture which adds enzymes and probiotics. So, the nutrients of the berries are left intact when they might otherwise be lost in the cooking process, and the naturally occurring bacteria, enzymes, and vitamins in the berries are allowed to proliferate through the fermentation process.

Baking Gluten Free Cookies with Coconut Flour

Baking Gluten Free Cookies with Coconut Flour

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Coconut flour is one of the trickiest, if not the trickiest, most finicky, temperamental, fickle gluten free flour to work with. However, when you get it right, coconut flour baked goods will be some of the best you’ve ever had, gluten free or otherwise.

One of the hardest baked goods to transfer over to gluten free with coconut flour would be cookies. How do you do it? It’s either not the right texture, too crumbly, too dense, requires too many eggs or simply bakes up into sawdust.

Here are some proven tips to making successful coconut flour cookies based on three textures: crispy cookies, cakey cookies, chewy cookies. I include 10 kitchen-proven recipes to get you started.

Virgin Coconut Oil Beats Drugs in Treating Alzheimer’s

Virgin Coconut Oil Beats Drugs in Treating Alzheimer’s

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Alzheimer’s Disease is a modern plague on the seniors in our society. More evidence continues to be published that Alzheimer’s is primarily a prescription drug induced disease. Coconut oil is an alternative to toxic drugs that has shown tremendous results in helping or even reversing Alzheimer’s disease. But your doctor will not likely know about either the causes of Alzheimer’s disease, or how coconut oil can help. Here is what you need to know.

Grassfed Traditions Adds New Artisan Butters from Grass-fed Milk

Grassfed Traditions Adds New Artisan Butters from Grass-fed Milk

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Tropical Traditions announced two new lines of artisan butters crafted from the milk of grass-fed pastured cows in their GrassfedTraditions line of products. Allgäu pure German Butter is from family farms in the Allgäu region of Southern Germany. These families feed their cows only grass and grass hay. Using their local breed, the Allgäu brown cow, the herdsmen in the Allgäu mountain region safely guide the cows down from the mountains to spend the winters in their cozy barns, and are led back up to the Alps every spring.

Nordic Creamery is family owned and operated making some of Wisconsin’s finest gourmet, artisan butter from the milk of cows on pasture. Award-winning Cheesemaker and Buttermaker Al Bekkum and his family live on the Bekkum-Langaard Farmstead owned and operated by their family since immigration from Norway in 1917. The farm is located among other Norwegian settlers in Westby, Wisconsin within Vernon County’s lush, green hills and valleys known as the Coulee Region. This un-glaciated land is recognized for its fertile soil and exceptional grazing land making their butter second to none.

These butters are shipped in coolers to all 50 states.

Baking Soda & Coconut Oil Cleanser for Problem Skin

Baking Soda & Coconut Oil Cleanser for Problem Skin

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Using a facial cleanser as a part of your daily skin care ritual is one of the essential outward practices to maintaining clean, healthy skin. Many acne–fighting and exfoliating facial cleansers and masks contain little beads to help “polish” the skin by taking dead layers off, while a creamy and cleaning base should help moisturize and condition.

Instead of shelling out money and being wasteful in the process of trial and error in trying to find a product that works for your skin, try making it at home with only two ingredients you probably already have: coconut oil and baking soda. Not only are these two ingredients readily available, they are also highly effective in treating problematic skin. Unlike all the fillers and toxic ingredients in normal store-bought cosmetics, these two ingredients are not only safe for your skin, but safe to be eaten as well.

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